Steve Bertrand

NAME

Async::Event::Interval - Extremely simple timed asynchronous events

Coverage Status

SYNOPSIS

A simple event. Multiple events can be simultaneously used. For an example using an event that can share data with the main application, examples of how to handle event crashes, and how to send parameters to your event callback, see "EXAMPLES".

    use Async::Event::Interval;

    my $event = Async::Event::Interval->new(
        1.5, 
        \&callback
    );

    $event->start;

    for (1..10){
        print "$_: in main loop\n";

        $event->stop if $_ == 3;
        $event->start if $_ == 7;

        if ($event->status){
            print "event is running\n";
        }

        if ($event->status == -1){
            print "event has crashed... restarting it\n";
            $event->restart;
        }

        sleep 1;
    }

    sub callback {
        print "timed event callback\n";
    }

DESCRIPTION

Very basic implementation of asynchronous events that are triggered by a timed interval.

Variables are not shared between the main application and the event. To do that, you'll need to use some form of memory sharing, such as IPC::Shareable. See "EXAMPLES" for an example. At this time, there is no real parameter passing or ability to return values. As I said... basic.

Each event is simply a separate forked process, which runs in a while loop.

METHODS

new($delay, $callback)

Returns a new Async::Event::Interval object. Does not create the event. Use start for that.

Parameters:

    $delay

Mandatory: The interval on which to trigger your event callback, in seconds. Represent partial seconds as a floating point number.

    $callback

Mandatory: A reference to a subroutine that will be called every time the interval expires.

start

Starts the event timer. Each time the interval is reached, the event callback is executed.

stop

Stops the event from being executed.

restart

Alias for start(). Re-starts a stop()ped event.

status

Returns the event's process ID (true) if it is running, 0 (false) if it isn't, and -1 if the event has crashed.

EXAMPLES

Event Parameters

You can send in a list of parameters to the event callback. Changing these within the main program will have no effect on the values sent into the event itself.

    use Async::Event::Interval

    my @params = qw(1 2 3);

    my $event = Async::Event::Interval->new(
        1,
        \&callback,
        @params
    );

    sub callback {
        my ($one, $two, $three) = @_;
        print "$one, $two, $three\n";
    }

Shared Data

A timed event where the event callback shares a hash reference with the main program.

    use Async::Event::Interval;
    use IPC::Shareable;

    my $href = {a => 0, b => 1};
    tie $href, 'IPC::Shareable', undef;

    my $event
        = Async::Event::Interval->new(10, \&callback);

    sub callback {
        $h->{a}++;
    }

Event crash: Restart event

    use warnings;
    use strict;
    use feature 'say';

    use Async::Event::Interval;

    my $event = Async::Event::Interval->new(
        2,
        sub {
            kill 9, $$;
        },
    );

    $event->start;

    sleep 1; # do stuff

    if ($event->status == -1){
        say "event crashed, restarting";
        $event->restart;
    }

Event crash: End program

    use warnings;
    use strict;
    use feature 'say';

    use Async::Event::Interval;

    my $event = Async::Event::Interval->new(
        2,
        sub {
            kill 9, $$;
        },
    );

    $event->start;

    sleep 1; # do stuff

    if ($event->status == -1){
        say "event crashed, can't continue...";
        exit;
    }

AUTHOR

Steve Bertrand, <steveb at cpan.org>

LICENSE AND COPYRIGHT

Copyright 2017 Steve Bertrand.

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of either: the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; or the Artistic License.

See http://dev.perl.org/licenses/ for more information.