Sisyphus

NAME

   Win32::GenRandom - XS wrappers of CryptGenRandom and RtlGenRandom.

FUNCTIONS

   @c = cgr($how_many, $size); # 1st arg is optional

    Returns a list of $how_many strings - each string consisting of
    $size random bytes.
    Returns just one string if the $how_many is not specified - in which
    case the function may be called either as:
      $c = cgr($size);
      or
      @c = cgr($size);
    This function uses CryptGenRandom to generate the random strings.

   @c = rgr($how_many, $size); # 1st arg is optional

    As for cgr() - but uses RtlGenRandom instead of CryptGenRandom
    to generate the random strings.
    (Not available on Windows 2000 and earlier - croaks if used on
    such a system.)

   @c = gr($how_many, $size); # $how_many is an optional arg.

    As for cgr() and rgr() - but returns rgr(@_) if
    $Win32::GenRandom::rtl_avail is true (ie if RtlGenRandom is
    available); otherwise returns cgr(@_).

   @c = cgr_uv($how_many); # $how_many is an optional arg.

    Returns a list of $how_many Perl internal unsigned integer
    values (UV). Whether the returned values are 32-bit or 64-bit
    depends upon your perl configuration.
    Returns just one UV if $how_many is not specified - in which
    case the function may be called either as:
      $c = cgr_uv();
      or
      @c = cgr_uv();
    This function uses CryptGenRandom to generate the random UVs.

   @c = rgr_uv($how_many); # $how_many is an optional arg.

    As for cgr_uv() - but uses RtlGenRandom instead of CryptGenRandom
    to generate the random UVs.
    (Not available on Windows 2000 and earlier - croaks if used on
    such a system.)

   @c = gr_uv($how_many); # $how_many is an optional arg.

    As for cgr_uv() and rgr_uv) - but returns rgr_uv() if
    $Win32::GenRandom::rtl_avail is true (ie if RtlGenRandom is
    available); otherwise returns cgr_uv(@_).

   @c = cgr_32($how_many); # $how_many is an optional arg.

    Returns a list of $how_many 32-bit unsigned integer values.
    Returns just one integer if $how_many is not specified - in
    which case the function may be called either as:
      $c = cgr_32();
      or
      @c = cgr_32();
    This function uses CryptGenRandom to generate the random UVs.

   @c = rgr_32($how_many); # $how_many is an optional arg.

    As for cgr_32() - but uses RtlGenRandom instead of CryptGenRandom
    to generate the random 32-bit values.
    (Not available on Windows 2000 and earlier - croaks if used on
    such a system.)

   @c = gr_32($how_many); # $how_many is an optional arg.

    As for cgr_32() and rgr_32() - but returns rgr_32(@_) if
    $Win32::GenRandom::rtl_avail is true (ie if RtlGenRandom is
    available); otherwise returns cgr_32(@_).

   @c = cgr_custom($how_many, $size, $container, $prov, $type, $flags);
   @c = cgr_custom_uv($how_many, $container, $prov, $type, $flags);
   @c = cgr_custom_32($how_many, $container, $prov, $type, $flags);

    Again, $how_many is optional and, if absent, defaults to 1 - in
    which case the returned value can be assigned to either a scalar
    or an array.
    These functions are the same as cgr(), cgr_uv() and cgr_32(), but
    they allow the user to specify the args that CryptAcquireContextA
    takes, instead of forcing the user to accept the defaults that
    cgr(), cgr_uv() and cgr_32() provide.
    $container is the key container name (string). Provide the empty
    string if you don't want to specify a particular value.
    $prov is the name (string) of the Cryptographic Service Provider to
    be used. Specify the empty string if you don't want to specify a
    particular CSP.
    $type specifies the type of provider to acquire.
    $flags is, as the name suggests, the flag value to be used.
    For your convenience, the allowed Type and Flag constants provided
    by wincrypt.h have been wrapped in perl subs of the same name - see
    the CONSTANTS section below.
    See the MSDN docs for CryptAcquireContext for more info.

   $which = which_crypto();

    Returns 'RtlGenRandom' if $Win32::GenRandom::rtl_avail is true;
    otherwise returns 'CryptGenRandom'.
    IOW it tells us which crypto functionality the "gr" functions will
    use - and is just another way to access the value of
    $Win32::GenRandom::rtl_avail (via subroutine call).

   $zero_func = whw(); # Mnemonic for "What Have We ?"

    The MSDN docs recommend zeroing the buffer that has received the
    random bytes as soon as we no longer need it to hold those bytes.
    We should use SecureZeroMemory() to do that but, although that
    function is available on Microsoft and mingw64.sf compilers, it's
    missing on at least some mingw.org compilers. Therefore, we fall
    back to using ZeroMemory() if SecureZeroMemory() is unavailable.
    Should neither be available, then the buffer simply doesn't get
    zeroed.
    This function returns the name of the function that is being used
    to zero the buffer ("SecureZeroMemory" or "ZeroMemory"), or
    returns "None" if neither function is available.
    I suspect this zeroing is not relevant for (at least) most apps,
    but it has minimal impact upon the time taken for rgr() to run.

CONSTANTS

    The following subroutines return the same value as that defined by
    their name in wincrypt.h:
     PROV_FORTEZZA
     PROV_RSA_SCHANNEL
     PROV_DSS_DH
     PROV_SSL
     PROV_RSA_SIG
     PROV_DSS
     PROV_MS_EXCHANGE
     PROV_RSA_FULL
     PROV_RSA_AES
     PROV_DH_SCHANNEL
     CRYPT_VERIFYCONTEXT
     CRYPT_DELETEKEYSET
     CRYPT_NEWKEYSET
     CRYPT_MACHINE_KEYSET
     CRYPT_DEFAULT_CONTAINER_OPTIONAL
     CRYPT_SILENT

LICENSE

    This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or
    modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.
    Copyright 2014, 2018 Sisyphus

AUTHOR

    Sisyphus <sisyphus at(@) cpan dot (.) org>