Igor Afanasyev

NAME

Config::Neat::Render - Render configs in Config::Neat format

SYNOPSIS

    use Config::Neat::Render;

    my $r = Config::Neat::Render->new();

    my $data = {
        'foo' => 'Hello, World!',
        'bar' => [1, 2, 3],
        'baz' => {
            'etc' => ['foo bar', 'baz', '', 1]
        }
    };

    print $r->render($data);

The output will be:

    bar         1 2 3

    baz
    {
        etc    `foo bar` baz `` 1
    }

    foo         Hello, World!

DESCRIPTION

This module allows you to render Config::Neat-compatible structures from your data (but read below for limitations). See https://github.com/iafan/Config-Neat/blob/master/sample/readme.nconf for the detailed file syntax specification. For parsing, use Config::Neat.

METHODS

Config::Neat::Render->new([$options])

Constructs a new renderer object. $options is a reference to a hash containing rendering options' overrides (see the RENDERING OPTIONS section below).

Config::Neat::Render->render($data[, $options])

Renders $data into a string and returns it. $options is a reference to a hash containing rendering options' overrides (see the RENDERING OPTIONS section below).

RENDERING OPTIONS

indentation

A number of spaces to indent each nested block contents with.

Default value: 4

key_spacing

A number of spaces between a key and and a value.

Default value: 4

wrap_width

A suggested maximum width of each line in a multiline string or array.

Default value: 60

brace_under

If true, put the opening brace under the key name, not on the same line

Default value: 1 (true)

separate_blocks

If true, surrond blocks with empty lines for better readability.

Default value: 1 (true)

align_all

If true, align all values in the configuration file (otherwise the values are aligned only within current block).

Default value: 1 (true)

sort

Note that hashes in Perl do not guarantee the correct order, so blocks may have individual parameters shuffled randomly. Set this option to a true value if you want to sort keys alphabetically, or to a reference to an array holding an ordered list of key names

Default value: undef (false)

Example:

    my $data = {
        'bar' => [1, 2, 3],
        'baz' => {
            'etc' => ['foo bar', 'baz', '', 1]
        }
        'foo' => 'Hello, World!',
    };

    my @order = qw(foo bar baz);

    print $r->render($data, {sort => \@order});

The output will be:

    foo        Hello, World!
    bar        1 2 3

    baz
    {
        etc    `foo bar` baz `` 1
    }
undefined_value

A string representation of the value to emit for undefined values

Default value: 'NO'

LIMITATIONS

Do not use Config::Neat::Render in conjunction with Config::Neat for arbitrary data serialization/desrialization. JSON and YAML will work better for this kind of task.

Why? Because Config::Neat was primarily designed to allow easier configuration file authoring and reading, and uses relaxed syntax where strings are treated like space-separated arrays (and vice versa), and where there's no strict definition for boolean types, no null values, etc.

It's the developer's responsibility to treat any given parameter as a boolean, or string, or an array. This means that once you serialize your string into Config::Neat format and parse it back, it will be converted to an array, and you will need to use `->as_string` method to get the value as string.

In other words, when doing this:

    my $c = Config::Neat->new();
    my $r = Config::Neat::Render->new();
    my $parsed_data = $c->parse($r->render($arbitrary_data));

$parsed_data will almost always be different from $arbitrary_data.

However, doing this immediately after:

    my $parsed_data_2 = $c->parse($r->render($parsed_data));

Should produce the same data structure again.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright (C) 2012-2014 Igor Afanasyev <igor.afanasyev@gmail.com>

SEE ALSO

https://github.com/iafan/Config-Neat