++ed by:
EXODIST TADEG XLAT KUERBIS MICHIELB

5 PAUSE users
3 non-PAUSE users.

Jean-Louis Morel

NAME

Win32::Console::ANSI - Perl extension to emulate ANSI console on Win32 system.

SYNOPSIS

  use Win32::Console::ANSI;

  print "\e[1;34mThis text is bold blue.\e[0m\n";
  print "This text is normal.\n";
  print "\e[33;45;1mBold yellow on magenta.\e[0m\n";
  print "This text is normal.\n";

With the Term::ANSIColor module one increases the readability:

  use Win32::Console::ANSI;
  use Term::ANSIColor;

  print color 'bold blue';
  print "This text is bold blue.\n";
  print color 'reset';
  print "This text is normal.\n";
  print colored ("Bold yellow on magenta.\n", 'bold yellow on_magenta');
  print "This text is normal.\n";

And even more with Term::ANSIScreen:

  use Win32::Console::ANSI;
  use Term::ANSIScreen qw/:color :cursor :screen/;

  locate 1, 1; print "@ This is (1,1)", savepos;
  print locate(24,60), "@ This is (24,60)"; loadpos;
  print down(2), clline, "@ This is (3,16)\n";
  color 'black on white'; clline;
  print "This line is black on white.\n";
  print color 'reset'; print "This text is normal.\n";
  print colored ("This text is bold blue.\n", 'bold blue');
  print "This text is normal.\n";
  print colored ['bold blue'], "This text is bold blue.\n";
  print "This text is normal.\n";

DESCRIPTION

Windows NT/2000/XP does not support ANSI escape sequences in Win32 Console applications. This module emulates an ANSI console for the script that uses it and also converts the characters from Windows code page to DOS code page (the so-called ANSI to OEM conversion). This conversion permits the display of the accented characters in the console like in the Windows- based editor used to type the script.

Escape sequences for Cursor Movement

  • \e[#A

    CUU: CUrsor Up: Moves the cursor up by the specified number of lines without changing columns. If the cursor is already on the top line, this sequence is ignored. \e[A is equivalent to \e[1A.

  • \e[#B

    CUD: CUrsor Down: Moves the cursor down by the specified number of lines without changing columns. If the cursor is already on the bottom line, this sequence is ignored. \e[B is equivalent to \e[1B.

  • \e[#C

    CUF: CUrsor Forward: Moves the cursor forward by the specified number of columns without changing lines. If the cursor is already in the rightmost column, this sequence is ignored. \e[C is equivalent to \e[1C.

  • \e[#D

    CUB: CUrsor Backward: Moves the cursor back by the specified number of columns without changing lines. If the cursor is already in the leftmost column, this sequence is ignored. \e[D is equivalent to \e[1D.

  • \e[#E

    CNL: Cursor Next Line: Moves the cursor down the indicated # of rows, to column 1. \e[E is equivalent to \e[1E.

  • \e[#F

    CPL: Cursor Preceding Line: Moves the cursor up the indicated # of rows, to column 1. \e[F is equivalent to \e[1F.

  • \e[#G

    CHA: Cursor Horizontal Absolute: Moves the cursor to indicated column in current row. \e[G is equivalent to \e[1G.

  • \e[#;#H

    CUP: CUrsor Position: Moves the cursor to the specified position. The first # specifies the line number, the second # specifies the column. If you do not specify a position, the cursor moves to the home position: the upper-left corner of the screen (line 1, column 1).

  • \e[#;#f

    HVP: Horizontal and Vertical Position. Works in the same way as the preceding escape sequence.

  • \e[s

    SCP: Save Cursor Position: Saves the current cursor position. You can move the cursor to the saved cursor position by using the Restore Cursor Position sequence.

  • \e[u

    RCP: Restore Cursor Position: Returns the cursor to the position stored by the Save Cursor Position sequence.

Escape sequences for Display Edition

  • \e[#J

    ED: Erase Display:

    • \e[0J

      Clears the screen from cursor to end of display. The cursor position is unchanged.

    • \e[1J

      Clears the screen from start to cursor. The cursor position is unchanged.

    • \e[2J

      Clears the screen and moves the cursor to the home position (line 1, column 1).

    \e[J is equivalent to \e[0J. (Some terminal/emulators respond to \e[J as if it were \e[2J. Here, the default is 0; it's the norm)

  • \e[#K

    EL: Erase Line:

    • \e[0K

      Clears all characters from the cursor position to the end of the line (including the character at the cursor position). The cursor position is unchanged.

    • \e[1K

      Clears all characters from start of line to the cursor position. (including the character at the cursor position). The cursor position is unchanged.

    • \e[2K

      Clears all characters of the whole line. The cursor position is unchanged.

    \e[K is equivalent to \e[0K. (Some terminal/emulators respond to \e[K as if it were \e[2K. Here, the default is 0; it's the norm)

  • \e[#L

    IL: Insert Lines: The cursor line and all lines below it move down # lines, leaving blank space. The cursor position is unchanged. The bottommost # lines are lost. \e[L is equivalent to \e[1L.

  • \e[#M

    DL: Delete Line: The block of # lines at and below the cursor are deleted; all lines below them move up # lines to fill in the gap, leaving # blank lines at the bottom of the screen. The cursor position is unchanged. \e[M is equivalent to \e[1M.

  • \e[#\@

    ICH: Insert CHaracter: The cursor character and all characters to the right of it move right # columns, leaving behind blank space. The cursor position is unchanged. The rightmost # characters on the line are lost. \e[\@ is equivalent to \e[1\@.

  • \e[#P

    DCH: Delete CHaracter: The block of # characters at and to the right of the cursor are deleted; all characters to the right of it move left # columns, leaving behind blank space. The cursor position is unchanged. \e[P is equivalent to \e[1P.

Escape sequences for Set Graphics Rendition

  • \e[#;...;#m

    SGM: Set Graphics Mode: Calls the graphics functions specified by the following values. These specified functions remain active until the next occurrence of this escape sequence. Graphics mode changes the colors and attributes of text (such as bold and underline) displayed on the screen.

    • Text attributes

             0    All attributes off
             1    Bold on
             4    Underscore on
             7    Reverse video on
             8    Concealed on
      
             21   Bold off
             24   Underscore off
             27   Reverse video off
             28   Concealed off
    • Foreground colors

             30    Black
             31    Red
             32    Green
             33    Yellow
             34    Blue
             35    Magenta
             36    Cyan
             37    White
    • Background colors

             40    Black
             41    Red
             42    Green
             43    Yellow
             44    Blue
             45    Magenta
             46    Cyan
             47    White

    \e[m is equivalent to \e[0m.

Escape sequences for Select Character Set

  • \e(U

    Selects null mapping - straight to character from the codepage of the console.

  • \e(K

    Selects Windows to DOS mapping. This is the default mapping. It's useful because one types the script with a Windows-based editor (using a Windows codepage) and the script prints its messages on the console using another codepage: without translation, the characters with a code greatest than 127 are different and the printed messages may be not readable.

    The conversion is done by the Windows internal functions. If a character cannot be represented in the console code page it is replaced by a question mark character.

  • \e(#X

    This escape sequence is not standard! It's an experimental one, just for fun :-)

    If (and only if) the console uses an Unicode police, it is possible to change its codepage with this escape sequence. No effect with an ordinary "Raster Font". (For Windows NT/2000/XP the currently available Unicode console font is the Lucida Console TrueType font.) # is the number of the codepage needed, 855 for cp855 for instance.

AUXILIARY FUNCTIONS

Because the module exports no symbols into the callers namespace, it's necessary to import the names of the functions before using them.

  • Cls( );

    Clears the screen with the current background color, and set cursor to (1,1).

  • $old_title = Title( [$new_title] );

    Gets and sets the title bar of the current console window. With no argument the title is not modified.

      use Win32::Console::ANSI qw/ Title /;
      for (reverse 0..5) {
        Title "Count down ... $_";
        sleep 1;
      }
  • ($old_x, $old_y) = Cursor( [$new_x, $new_y] );

    Gets and sets the cursor position (the upper-left corner of the screen is at (1, 1)). With no arguments the cursor position is not modified. If one of the two coordinates $new_x or $new_y is 0, the corresponding coordinate doesn't change.

      use Win32::Console::ANSI qw/ Cursor /;
      ($x, $y) = Cursor();     # reads cursor position
      Cursor(5, 8);            # puts the cursor at column 5, line 8
      Cursor(5, 0);            # puts the cursor at column 5, line doesn't change
      Cursor(0, 8);            # puts the cursor at line 8, column doesn't change
      Cursor(0, 0);            # the cursor doesn't change a position (useless!)
      ($x, $y) = Cursor(5, 8); # reads cursor position AND puts cursor at (5, 8)
  • ($Xmax, $Ymax) = XYMax( );

    Gets the maximum cursor position. If ($x, $y) = Cursor() we have always 1 <= $x <= $Xmax and 1 <= $y <= $Ymax.

  • $success = SetConsoleSize( $width, $height );

    Sets the new size, in columns and rows, of the screen buffer. The specified $width and $height cannot be less than the width and height of the screen buffer's window. The specified dimensions also cannot be less than the minimum size allowed by the system.

    If the function succeeds, the return value is nonzero. If the function fails, the return value is zero and the extended error message is in $^E.

  • $old_ACP = ScriptCP( [$new_ACP] );

    Set the codepage of the script and return the old value.

LIMITATIONS

  • Due to DOS-console limitations, the blink mode (text attributes 5 and 25) is not implemented.

SEE ALSO

Win32::Console, Term::ANSIColor, Term::ANSIScreen.

AUTHOR

J-L Morel <jl_morel@bribes.org>

Home page: http://www.bribes.org/perl/wANSIConsole.html

COPYRIGHT

Copyright (c) 2003-2005 J-L Morel. All rights reserved.

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.