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102 non-PAUSE user(s).

Peter Rabbitson
and 1 contributors

NAME

DBIx::Class::SQLMaker::LimitDialects - SQL::Abstract::Limit-like functionality for DBIx::Class::SQLMaker

DESCRIPTION

This module replicates a lot of the functionality originally found in SQL::Abstract::Limit. While simple limits would work as-is, the more complex dialects that require e.g. subqueries could not be reliably implemented without taking full advantage of the metadata locked within DBIx::Class::ResultSource classes. After reimplementation of close to 80% of the SQL::Abstract::Limit functionality it was deemed more practical to simply make an independent DBIx::Class-specific limit-dialect provider.

SQL LIMIT DIALECTS

Note that the actual implementations listed below never use * literally. Instead proper re-aliasing of selectors and order criteria is done, so that the limit dialect are safe to use on joined resultsets with clashing column names.

Currently the provided dialects are:

LimitOffset

 SELECT ... LIMIT $limit OFFSET $offset

Supported by PostgreSQL and SQLite

LimitXY

 SELECT ... LIMIT $offset $limit

Supported by MySQL and any SQL::Statement based DBD

RowNumberOver

 SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT *, ROW_NUMBER() OVER( ORDER BY ... ) AS RNO__ROW__INDEX FROM (
   SELECT ...
  )
 ) WHERE RNO__ROW__INDEX BETWEEN ($offset+1) AND ($limit+$offset)

ANSI standard Limit/Offset implementation. Supported by DB2 and MSSQL >= 2005.

SkipFirst

 SELECT SKIP $offset FIRST $limit * FROM ...

Suported by Informix, almost like LimitOffset. According to SQL::Abstract::Limit ... SKIP $offset LIMIT $limit ... is also supported.

FirstSkip

 SELECT FIRST $limit SKIP $offset * FROM ...

Supported by Firebird/Interbase, reverse of SkipFirst. According to SQL::Abstract::Limit ... ROWS $limit TO $offset ... is also supported.

RowNum

Depending on the resultset attributes one of:

 SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT *, ROWNUM rownum__index FROM (
   SELECT ...
  ) WHERE ROWNUM <= ($limit+$offset)
 ) WHERE rownum__index >= ($offset+1)

or

 SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT *, ROWNUM rownum__index FROM (
    SELECT ...
  )
 ) WHERE rownum__index BETWEEN ($offset+1) AND ($limit+$offset)

or

 SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT ...
  ) WHERE ROWNUM <= ($limit+1)

Supported by Oracle.

Top

 SELECT * FROM

 SELECT TOP $limit FROM (
  SELECT TOP $limit FROM (
   SELECT TOP ($limit+$offset) ...
  ) ORDER BY $reversed_original_order
 ) ORDER BY $original_order

Unreliable Top-based implementation, supported by MSSQL < 2005.

CAVEAT

Due to its implementation, this limit dialect returns incorrect results when $limit+$offset > total amount of rows in the resultset.

FetchFirst

 SELECT * FROM
 (
 SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT * FROM (
   SELECT * FROM ...
  ) ORDER BY $reversed_original_order
    FETCH FIRST $limit ROWS ONLY
 ) ORDER BY $original_order
   FETCH FIRST $limit ROWS ONLY
 )

Unreliable FetchFirst-based implementation, supported by IBM DB2 <= V5R3.

CAVEAT

Due to its implementation, this limit dialect returns incorrect results when $limit+$offset > total amount of rows in the resultset.

RowCountOrGenericSubQ

This is not exactly a limit dialect, but more of a proxy for Sybase ASE. If no $offset is supplied the limit is simply performed as:

 SET ROWCOUNT $limit
 SELECT ...
 SET ROWCOUNT 0

Otherwise we fall back to "GenericSubQ"

GenericSubQ

 SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT ...
 )
 WHERE (
  SELECT COUNT(*) FROM $original_table cnt WHERE cnt.id < $original_table.id
 ) BETWEEN $offset AND ($offset+$rows-1)

This is the most evil limit "dialect" (more of a hack) for really stupid databases. It works by ordering the set by some unique column, and calculating the amount of rows that have a less-er value (thus emulating a "RowNum"-like index). Of course this implies the set can only be ordered by a single unique column. Also note that this technique can be and often is excruciatingly slow.

Currently used by Sybase ASE, due to lack of any other option.

AUTHORS

See "CONTRIBUTORS" in DBIx::Class.

LICENSE

You may distribute this code under the same terms as Perl itself.