++ed by:
Олег Пронин

NAME

Panda::Date - fast Class::Date compatible framework. In C :-)

DESCRIPTION

Panda::Date is almost fully compatible with Class::Date, but has several more features and much greater perfomance. It is 100% written in C/C++.

By itself, Panda::Date supports dates between -2**31 and 2**31-1 years. But because of most OS mktime's restrictions only [1900, 2**31-1] years are supported.

SYNOPSIS

    use Panda::Date qw/now date today rdate idate :const/;
    
    my $date = Panda::Date->new($epoch);
    $date = Panda::Date->new([$y,$m,$d,$h,$m,$s]);
    $date = Panda::Date->new({year => $y, month => $m, day => $d, hour => $h, min => $m, sec => $s});
    $date = Panda::Date->new("2013-03-05 23:45:56");
    $date = now; # same as Panda::Date->new(time()) but faster
    $date = Panda::Date::now();
    $date = Panda::Date->now;
    $date = today; # same as Panda::Date->new(time())->truncate but faster
    $date = Panda::Date::today();
    $date = Panda::Date->today;
    
    # create using function 'date'
    $date = date [$year,$month,$day,$hour,$min,$sec]; 
    $date = date { year => $year, month => $month, day => $day, hour => $hour, min => $min, sec => $sec };
    $date = date "2001-11-12 07:13:12";
    $date = date 123456789;
    
    # creating relative date object
    # (normally you don't need to create this object explicitly)
    $reldate = new Panda::Date::Rel "3Y 1M 3D 6h 2m 4s";
    $reldate = new Panda::Date::Rel "6Y";
    $reldate = new Panda::Date::Rel $secs;  # secs
    $reldate = new Panda::Date::Rel [$year,$month,$day,$hour,$min,$sec];
    $reldate = new Panda::Date::Rel { year => $year, month => $month, day => $day, hour => $hour, min => $min, sec => $sec };
    $reldate = rdate "-1M -3D 6h";
    $reldate = 3*MONTH; # "3M"
    $reldate = 2*YEAR + MONTH - 30*DAY; # "2Y 1M -30D"
    print $reldate/2; # 1Y 5h 14m 32s
    $reldate = YEAR/2 + HOUR/2; # 6M 30m
    
    $date;              # prints the date in default output format (ISO/SQL format)
    $date->epoch;       # unix timestamp
    $date->year;        # year, e.g: 2001
    $date->_year;       # year - 1900, e.g. 101
    $date->yr;          # 2-digit year 0-99, e.g 1
    $date->mon;         # month 1..12
    $date->month;       # same as prev.
    $date->_mon;        # month 0..11
    $date->_month;      # same as prev.
    $date->day;         # day of month
    $date->mday;        # day of month
    $date->day_of_month;# same as prev.
    $date->hour;
    $date->min;
    $date->minute;      # same as prev.
    $date->sec;
    $date->second;      # same as prev.
    $date->wday;        # 1 = Sunday
    $date->day_of_week; # same as prev.
    $date->_wday;       # 0 = Sunday
    $date->ewday;       # 1 = Monday, 7 = Sunday
    $date->yday;        # [1-366]
    $date->day_of_year; # same as prev.
    $date->_yday;       # [0-365]
    $date->isdst;       # DST?
    $date->daylight_savings; # same as prev.
    $date->strftime($format) # POSIX strftime (without the huge POSIX.pm)
    $date->monname;     # name of month, eg: March
    $date->monthname;   # same as prev.
    $date->wdayname;    # Thursday
    $date->day_of_weekname # same as prev.
    $date->hms          # 01:23:45
    $date->ymd          # 2000/02/29
    $date->mdy          # 02/29/2000
    $date->dmy          # 29/02/2000
    $date->meridiam     # 01:23 AM
    $date->ampm         # AM/PM
    $date->string       # 2000-02-29 12:21:11 (format can be changed)
    "$date"             # same as prev.
    $date->iso          # 2000-02-29 12:21:11
    $date->tzoffset     # timezone-offset (in seconds)
    $date->tz           # returns the base timezone as you specify, eg: CET
    $date->tzdst        # returns the real timezone with dst information, eg: CEST
    
    ($year,$month,$day,$hour,$min,$sec)=$date->array;
    ($year,$month,$day,$hour,$min,$sec)=@{ $date->aref };
    # !! $year: 1900-, $month: 1-12
    
    ($sec,$min,$hour,$day,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst)=$date->struct;
    ($sec,$min,$hour,$day,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst)=@{ $date->sref };
    # !! $year: 0-, $month: 0-11
    
    %hash=$date->hash;
    # !! $hash{year}: 1900-, $hash{month}: 1-12
    $hash=$date->href; # $hash can be reused as a constructor
    print $hash->{year}."-".$hash->{month}. ... $hash->{sec} ... ;
    
    # constructing new date based on an existing one:
    $new_date = $date->clone;
    $new_date = $date->clone({year => 1977, sec => 14});
    # valid keys: year, _year, month, _month, day, hour, min, sec
    
    $date->month_begin  # First day of the month (date object)
    $date->month_end    # Last day of the month
    $date->days_in_month # 28..31
    
    # changing date stringify format globally
    Panda::Date->string_format("%Y%m%d%H%M%S");
    print $date       # result: 20011222000000
    Panda::Date->string_format(undef);
    print $date       # result: 2000-02-29 12:21:11
    Panda::Date->string_format("%Y/%m/%d");
    print $date       # result: 1994/10/13
    
    # error handling
    $a = date($date_string);
    if ($a) { # valid date
      ...
    } else { # invalid date
      if ($a->error == E_UNPARSABLE) { ... }
      print $a->errstr;
    }
    
    # "month-border adjust" flag 
    Panda::Date->month_border_adjust(0); # this is the default
    print date("2001-01-31")+'1M'; # will print 2001-03-03
    Panda::Date->month_border_adjust(1);
    print date("2001-01-31")+'1M'; # will print 2001-02-28
    
    # date range check
    Panda::Date->range_check(0); # this is the default
    print date("2001-02-31"); # will print 2001-03-03
    Panda::Date->range_check(1);
    print date("2001-02-31"); # will print nothing
    
    # getting values of a relative date object
    int($reldate);         # reldate in seconds (assumed 1 month = 2_629_744 secs)
    "$reldate";            # reldate in "1Y 2M 3D 4h 5m 6s" format
    $reldate->year;
    $reldate->mon;
    $reldate->month;       # same as prev.
    $reldate->day;
    $reldate->hour;
    $reldate->min;
    $reldate->minute;      # same as prev.
    $reldate->sec;         # same as $reldate
    $reldate->second;      # same as prev.
    $reldate->to_sec;      # relative date in seconds
    $reldate->to_min;      # relative date in minutes
    $reldate->to_hour;     # relative date in hours
    $reldate->to_day;      # relative date in days
    $reldate->to_month;    # relative date in months
    $reldate->to_year;     # relative date in years
     
    # arithmetic with dates:
    print date([2001,12,11,4,5,6])->truncate; # will print "2001-12-11"
    
    $new_date = $date+$reldate;
    $date2    = $date+'3Y 2D';   # 3 Years and 2 days
    $date3    = $date+[1,2,3];   # $date plus 1 year, 2 months, 3 days
    
    $new_date = $date-$reldate;
    $date2    = $date-'3Y';      # 3 Yearss
    $date3    = $date-[1,2,3];   # $date minus 1 year, 2 months, 3 days
    
    $intdate = $date1-$date2;
    $intdate2 = date('2000-11-12')-'2000-11-10';
    $intdate3    = $date3-'1977-11-10';
    
    $intdate = date("2013-10-25") - "2012-03-10";
    $intdate->from;                # lower date in interval (2012-03-10)
    $intdate->till;                # upper date in interval (2013-10-25)
    $reldate = $intdate->relative; # relative date ("1Y 7M 15D")
    $intdate->sec;                 # accurate number of seconds in interval
    $intdate->month;               # accurate number of months in interval
    $reldate->to_sec;              # number of seconds in relative date (inaccurate)
    
    $days_between = (Class::Date->new('2001-11-12')-'2001-07-04')->day;
    
    # comparison between absolute dates
    print $date1 > $date2 ? "I am older" : "I am younger";
    
    # comparison between relative dates
    print $reldate1 > $reldate2 ? "I am faster" : "I am slower";
    
    # Adding / Subtracting months and years are sometimes tricky:
    print date("2001-01-29") + '1M' - '1M'; # gives "2001-02-01"
    print date("2000-02-29") + '1Y' - '1Y'; # gives "2000-03-01"
    
    # Named interface ($date2 does not necessary to be a Class::Date object)
    $date1->string;               # same as $date1 in scalar context
    $date1->subtract($date2);     # same as $date1 - $date2
    $date1->add($date2);          # same as $date1 + $date2
    $date1->compare($date2);      # same as $date1 <=> $date2
    
    $reldate1->sec;               # same as $reldate1 in numeric or scalar context
    $reldate1->compare($reldate2);# same as $reldate1 <=> $reldate2
    $reldate1->add($reldate2);    # same as $reldate1 + $reldate2
    $reldate1->neg                # used for subtraction

CLASS METHODS

new($epoch | \@ymdhms | \%ymdhms | $iso_fmt | $date)

Creates a date object using one of these source data types:

123456 or "123456"

Treated as 64-bit UNIX timestamp. To define a date below 1970 year, use negative timestamp.

[$year, $month, $day, $hour, $min, $sec]

If some args are missing, will use defaults [2000,1,1,0,0,0]

{year => x, month => x, day => x, hour => x, min => x, sec => x}

If some args are missing, will use defaults defined in previous section.

"YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS"

A standard ISO(-like) date format. Additional ".fraction" part is ignored. Any number of trailing parameters can be missing. So the actual format is "YYYY-[MM[-DD[ HH[:MM[:SS[.MS]]]]]]" Minimal string is "YYYY-". Fractional part of seconds will be ignored. If some args are missing, will use defaults defined in previous section.

Another date object

Clones another object

If there is any error while creating an object, properties error() and errstr() will be set. The object itself will return false in boolean context, empty string in string context and so on.

now()

Same as

    Panda::Date->new(time());
    

but runs much faster. Can be called as function, class method or object method.

today()

Same as

    Panda::Date->new(time())->truncate
    

but runs much faster. Can be called as function, class method or object method.

today_epoch()

Same as

    today()->epoch

but runs faster. Can be called as function, class method or object method.

string_format([$format])

strftime-compatible format that will be used to stringify the date with '.', "", to_string(), string() or as_string(). If it's false (the default) then iso() will be used.

month_border_adjust([$bool])

Used to switch on or off the month-adjust feature. This is used only when someone adds months or years to a date and then the resulted date became invalid. An example: adding one month to "2001-01-31" will result "2001-02-31", and this is an invalid date.

When month_border_adjust is false, this result simply normalized, and becomes "2001-03-03". This is the default behaviour.

When month_border_adjust is true, this result becomes "2001-02-28". So when the date overflows, then it returns the last day insted.

Both settings keeps the time information.

range_check([$true_false])

If parts of the date are invalid or the whole date is not valid, e.g. 2001-02-31 then:

when range_check is not set (the default), then these date values are automatically converted to a valid date (normalized): 2001-03-03

when range_check is set, then a date "2001-02-31" became invalid date and error() is set to E_RANGE.

FUNCTIONS

date($epoch | \@ymdhms | \%ymdhms | $iso_fmt | $date)

Same as

    Panda::Date->new($arg);

now(), today()

See CLASS METHODS

rdate($rel_string | $seconds | \@rel_array | \%rel_hash | $reldate)

Same as

    Panda::Date::Rel->new($arg);
    

rdate($from, $till)

Same as

    Panda::Date::Rel->new(from, till);
    

idate($epoch | \@ymdhms | \%ymdhms | $iso_fmt | $date, $epoch | \@ymdhms | \%ymdhms | $iso_fmt | $date)

Same as

    Panda::Date::Int->new($arg1, $arg2);

OBJECT METHODS

set_from($epoch | \@ymdhms | \%ymdhms | $iso_fmt | $date)

Set date from data or another date. This is much faster than creating new object.

epoch([$epoch])

UNIX timestamp (64bit)

year([$year])

Year [1900, 2**31-1]

_year([$year])

Year (year() - 1900)

yr([$yr])

Last 2 digits of the year. [0-99]

month([$mon]), mon

Month [1-12]

_month([$mon]), _mon

Month [0-11]

day([$day]), mday, day_of_month

Day of month [1-31]

hour([$hour])

[0-23]

min([$min]), minute

[0-59]

sec([$sec]), second

[0-60]

wday([$wday]), day_of_week

Day of week. 1 = Sunday, 2 = Monday, ... , 7 = Saturday. If you pass an argument then another day of the same week will be set.

_wday([$_wday])

Day of week. 0 = Sunday, 1 = Monday, ... , 6 = Saturday. If you pass an argument then another day of the same week will be set.

ewday([$ewday])

Day of week (Europe-friendly). 1 = Monday, ..., 7 = Sunday. If you pass an argument then another day of the same week will be set.

yday([$yday]), day_of_year

Day of the year [1-366]. If you pass an argument then another day of the same year will be set.

_yday([$_yday])

Day of the year [0-365]. If you pass an argument then another day of the same year will be set.

isdst(), daylight_savings()

Is daylight savings time in effect now (true/false).

strftime($format)

Works like strftime from POSIX (POSIX is not used!)

monthname(), monname()

Full name of the month in the genitive

wdayname(), day_of_weekname()

Full name of the day in the nominative case.

hms()

Same as strftime('%H:%M:%S') but much faster

ymd()

Same as strftime('%Y/%m/%d') but much faster

mdy()

Same as strftime('%m/%d/%Y') but much faster

dmy()

Same as strftime('%d/%m/%Y') but much faster

"", to_string(), string(), as_string()

By default returns iso(). String format can be changed via string_format()

'bool', to_bool()

Called implicitly in boolean context

    if ($date)
    $date ? EXPR1 : EXPR2
    $date && $something
    

Returns TRUE if date has no errors (i.e. has no parsing or out of range errors, etc), otherwise FALSE

'0+', to_number()

Returns epoch() in numeric context

iso(), sql()

Same as strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S') but much faster

mysql()

Same as strftime('%Y%m%d%H%M%S') but much faster

ampm()

Returns string 'AM' or 'PM'

meridiam()

Returns time in "11:35 AM" format (american 12h style)

tzoffset()

Returns current timezone offset from UTC in seconds

tz()

Returns base name of the current timezone

tzdst()

Returns full name of the current timezone (depends on whether DST is active at the moment pointed to by date or not)

array()

Returns 6 elements list - $year,$month,$day,$hour,$min,$sec. $year is year() [2013=2013] $month is month() [1-12]

aref()

Same as [array()] (array reference)

struct()

Returns 9 elements list - $sec,$min,$hour,$day,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst $year is _year() [113 = 2013] $month is _month() [0-11] $wday is _wday() [0-6] $yday is _yday() [0-365]

sref()

Same as [struct()] (array reference)

hash()

Returns key-value list. Keys are 'year', 'month', 'day', 'hour', 'min', 'sec' year, month are human-friendly (2013 year, month [1-12])

href()

Same as {href()} (hash reference)

clone([\%diff])

Returns copy of the date. If you pass a hash ref then new date object will have these changes.

Supported keys: 'year' (YYYY), '_year' (YYYY-1900), 'month' [1-12], '_month' [0-11], 'day', 'hour', 'min', 'sec'.

month_begin()

Returns the beggining of month. Only day of month is changed, HMS are preserved.

month_begin_me()

Same as month_begin() but changes current object instead of cloning.

month_end()

Returns the end of month. Only day of month is changed, HMS are preserved.

month_end_me()

Same as month_end() but changes current object instead of cloning.

days_in_month()

Returns the number of days in month

error()

Returns error code occured during creating or cloning object (if any). If no errors returns E_OK.

errstr()

Returns error string if any, otherwise undef.

truncate()

Return copy of the current date with HMS set to 0. Same as ->clone({hour => 0, min => 0, sec => 0}), but much faster.

truncate_me()

Same as truncate_me() but changes current object instead of cloning. This is extremely faster.

'<=>', 'cmp', compare($date | $iso_string | $epoch | \@array | \%hash)

Compares 2 dates and returns -1, 0 or 1. If second operand is not an object then it's created. If second operand is object but not Panda::Date then it croaks.

'+', add($reldate | $rel_string | $seconds | \@rel_array | \%rel_hash)

Adds a relative date to date object. If second operand is not an object then it's created (Panda::Date::Rel).

'+=', add_me($reldate | $rel_string | $seconds | \@rel_array | \%rel_hash)

Same as add() but changes current object instead of creating new one.

'-', subtract($reldate | $rel_string | $seconds | \@rel_array | \%rel_hash | $date | $iso_string)

Subtracts a relative date or another date from the date object. In case of relative date the result is a Panda::Date object. Otherwise the result is Panda::Date::Int. If second operand is not an object then it's created (Panda::Date::Rel or Panda::Date).

'-=', subtract_me($reldate | $rel_string | $seconds | \@rel_array | \%rel_hash)

Same as subtract() but changes current object instead of creating new one.

CONSTANTS

E_OK

No errors

E_UNPARSABLE

Wrong date string format

E_RANGE

Invalid date (or date part) supplied when range_check() is in effect

YEAR

Constant for rdate("1Y"). These (YEAR...SEC) objects are constants (read-only).

If you try to change these objects you'll get an exception.

MONTH

Constant for rdate("1M").

DAY

Constant for rdate("1D").

HOUR

Constant for rdate("1h").

MIN

Constant for rdate("1m").

SEC

Constant for rdate("1s").

OPERATOR OVERLOAD RULES

See screenshot http://crazypanda.ru/v/clip2net/a/v/ri93sO22KI.png

Class::Date INCOMPABILITIES

Panda::Date doesn't support per-object timezones yet.

It works in default (user) timezone. You can change it via $ENV{TZ} + POSIX::tzset.

Panda::Date constructor doesn't support "YYYYMMDDhhmmss" format as well as -DateParse feature

For now.

day_of_week() returns wday()

In Class::Date it returns _wday()

yday(), day_of_year() return [1-366]

In Class::Date they return [0-365]. If you need that behaviour, use _yday() method.

hash() and href() methods return 6 elements

In Class::Date they return 13 elements: additionally _year, _month, wday, yday, isdst, epoch, minute

clone() receives hash reference and less keys are supported in there.

Class::Date's clone() receives list of key-value pairs and supports key aliases like 'mon' etc.

there is no DST_ADJUST setting.

Panda::Date always performs all calculations with DST_ADJUST disabled for now. That means that (in MSK timezone there was DST change 27 mar 1:59:59 -> 3:00:00)

2005-03-27 01:00:01 + 1h = 2005-03-27 02:00:01 (not 2005-03-27 03:00:01).

I believe that it doesn't matter in most cases. To fix that i would need to call mktime() after every calculation, but it's very slow (about 150_000/s on my machine) so i don't want to slow don't this module by 30x.

I'm working on a effective solution of this problem (using timezone info without mktime() to calc DST borders)

Anyway, in Class::Date, 2005-03-27 01:00:01 + 1h = 2005-03-27 01:00:01. You'll hang in infinite loop if you write "while ($date < $till) { $date += '1h'; }"

Panda::Date::Rel constructors don't support ISO/SQL date format ("YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS")

Because it's a DATE format NOT RELATIVE.

Panda::Date::Rel stringifies to "2M 3D 100s"

Class::Date::Rel stringifies to approximate number of seconds in interval (useless imho)

Panda::Date::Rel consists of all 6 params: YMDhms.

Class::Date::Rel consists of only months and seconds.

Panda::Date::Rel's sec/min/hour/day/month/year returns properties of object.

If you have relative date "1Y 2M", year() will return 1, month() - 2, day() - 0, etc. If you need to calculate all the period in, for example, months, use ->to_month() (will return 14). Such calculations can be inaccurate, for example, rdate("1M")->to_sec

subtracting date from another date returns Panda::Date::Int object, not a Panda::Date::Rel

Panda::Date::Int is an Interval object and is an absolutely new term.

CAVEATS

Panda::Date doesn't support subclassing for now.

Subclassing is manually turned off because enabling it will drop 20% perfomance off because in XS ->isa() is much slower than ref($a) eq "xxx".

If you subclass Panda::Date it won't work correct.

As any other C++-class-based framework, you can't clone Panda::Date::* objects using serializers or clone utils.

You will receive SIGSEGV. If you want to clone a Panda::Date::* object, use it's clone() method.

However, cloning and serializing/deserializing via Storable is supported as Panda::Date::* classes define special hooks for Storable. But it's about 20 times slower than using clone() method.

PERFOMANCE

Panda::Date operates 40-70x faster than Class::Date

    my $cdate = new Class::Date("2013-06-05 23:45:56");
    my $date  = new Panda::Date("2013-06-05 23:45:56");
    my $crel = Class::Date::Rel->new("1M");
    my $rel  = rdate("1M");
    my @buff;
    
    timethese(-1, {
        cdate_new_str   => sub { push @buff, new Class::Date("2013-01-25 21:26:43"); }, # push @buff to avoid calling DESTROY
        panda_new_str   => sub { push @buff, new Panda::Date("2013-01-25 21:26:43"); },
        cdate_new_epoch => sub { push @buff, new Class::Date(1000000000); },
        panda_new_epoch => sub { push @buff, new Panda::Date(1000000000); },
        panda_new_reuse => sub { state $date = new Panda::Date(0); $date->set_from(1000000000); },
        
        cdate_now => sub { Class::Date->now; },
        panda_now => sub { now(); },
        
        cdate_truncate    => sub { $cdate->truncate },
        panda_truncate_me => sub { $date->truncate_me },
        panda_truncate    => sub { $date->truncate },
        cdate_today  => sub { Class::Date->now->truncate; },
        panda_today1 => sub { now()->truncate_me; },
        panda_today2 => sub { today(); },
        cdate_stringify => sub { $cdate->string },
        panda_stringify => sub { $date->to_string },
        cdate_strftime => sub { $cdate->strftime("%H:%M:%S") },
        panda_strftime => sub { $date->strftime("%H:%M:%S") },
        cdate_clone_simple => sub { $cdate->clone },
        panda_clone_simple => sub { $date->clone },
        cdate_clone_change => sub { $cdate->clone(year => 2008, month => 12) },
        panda_clone_change => sub { $date->clone({year => 2008, month => 12}) },
        cdate_rel_new_sec => sub { new Class::Date::Rel 1000 },
        pdate_rel_new_sec => sub { new Panda::Date::Rel 1000 },
        cdate_rel_new_str => sub { new Class::Date::Rel "1Y 2M 3D 4h 5m 6s" },
        panda_rel_new_str => sub { new Panda::Date::Rel "1Y 2M 3D 4h 5m 6s" },
        cdate_add     => sub { $cdate = $cdate + '1M' },
        panda_add     => sub { $date = $date + '1M' },
        panda_add_me  => sub { $date += '1M' },
        panda_add_me2 => sub { $date += MONTH },
        panda_add_me3 => sub { $date->month($date->month+1) },
        cdate_compare => sub { $cdate == $cdate },
        panda_compare => sub { $date == $date },
    });
    
    #RESULTS
    
    #cdate_new_epoch:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.05 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.05 CPU) @ 45386.90/s (n=47869)
    #panda_new_epoch:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.06 usr +  0.03 sys =  1.09 CPU) @ 1006632.23/s (n=1101004)
    #cdate_new_str:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.10 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.10 CPU) @ 15616.91/s (n=17203)
    #panda_new_str:  0 wallclock secs ( 0.98 usr +  0.09 sys =  1.07 CPU) @ 866252.61/s (n=927161)
    #panda_new_reuse:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.02 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.02 CPU) @ 7247433.28/s (n=7417295)
    
    #cdate_now:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.02 usr +  0.05 sys =  1.07 CPU) @ 41146.86/s (n=44040)
    #panda_now:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.02 usr +  0.11 sys =  1.12 CPU) @ 1043915.56/s (n=1174405)
    
    #cdate_truncate:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.09 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.09 CPU) @ 20277.41/s (n=22020)
    #panda_truncate:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.09 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.09 CPU) @ 1247845.29/s (n=1355082)
    #panda_truncate_me:  0 wallclock secs ( 1.06 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.06 CPU) @ 8289918.12/s (n=8808038)
    
    #cdate_today:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.04 usr +  0.02 sys =  1.05 CPU) @ 13048.41/s (n=13762)
    #panda_today1:  1 wallclock secs ( 0.99 usr +  0.07 sys =  1.06 CPU) @ 592136.47/s (n=629145)
    #panda_today2:  1 wallclock secs ( 0.95 usr +  0.09 sys =  1.03 CPU) @ 657009.45/s (n=677541)
    
    #cdate_stringify:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.05 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.05 CPU) @ 84136.12/s (n=88080)
    #panda_stringify:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.03 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.03 CPU) @ 4019354.18/s (n=4144959)
    
    #cdate_strftime:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.05 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.05 CPU) @ 91452.18/s (n=95739)
    #panda_strftime:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.06 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.06 CPU) @ 1441724.24/s (n=1531832)
    
    #cdate_clone_simple:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.05 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.05 CPU) @ 21747.67/s 
    #panda_clone_simple:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.08 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.08 CPU) @ 1256887.65/s
    #cdate_clone_change:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.05 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.05 CPU) @ 20878.22/s 
    #panda_clone_change:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.04 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.04 CPU) @ 605492.93/s 
    
    #cdate_rel_new_sec:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.08 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.08 CPU) @ 145888.46/s (n=157286)
    #cdate_rel_new_str:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.06 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.06 CPU) @ 43176.47/s (n=45875)
    #panda_rel_new_sec:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.10 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.10 CPU) @ 695299.63/s (n=765916)
    #panda_rel_new_str:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.05 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.05 CPU) @ 647203.34/s (n=677541)
    
    #cdate_add:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.09 usr +  0.02 sys =  1.10 CPU) @ 13881.19/s (n=15291)
    #panda_add:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.08 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.08 CPU) @ 907751.88/s (n=978670)
    #panda_add_me:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.07 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.07 CPU) @ 4389017.23/s (n=4697620)
    #panda_add_me2:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.07 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.07 CPU) @ 4702518.19/s (n=5033164)
    #panda_add_me3:  0 wallclock secs ( 1.05 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.05 CPU) @ 3036845.51/s (n=3202923)
    
    #cdate_compare:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.07 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.07 CPU) @ 60509.43/s (n=64764)
    #panda_compare:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.06 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.06 CPU) @ 4421289.41/s (n=4697620)

AUTHOR

Pronin Oleg <syber@cpan.org>, Crazy Panda, CP Decision LTD

LICENSE

You may distribute this code under the same terms as Perl itself.




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