NAME

MooX::Press - quickly create a bunch of Moo/Moose/Mouse classes and roles

SYNOPSIS

  package MyApp;
  use Types::Standard qw(Str Num);
  use MooX::Press (
    role => [
      'Livestock',
      'Pet',
      'Milkable' => {
        can => [
          'milk' => sub { print "giving milk\n"; },
        ],
      },
    ],
    class => [
      'Animal' => {
        has => [
          'name'   => Str,
          'colour',
          'age'    => Num,
          'status' => { enum => ['alive', 'dead'], default => 'alive' },
        ],
        subclass => [
          'Panda',
          'Cat'  => { with => ['Pet'] },
          'Dog'  => { with => ['Pet'] },
          'Cow'  => { with => ['Livestock', 'Milkable'] },
          'Pig'  => { with => ['Livestock'] },
        ],
      },
    ],
  );

Using your classes:

  use MyApp;
  
  my $kitty = MyApp->new_cat(name => "Grey", status => "alive");
  # or:       MyApp::Cat->new(name => "Grey", status => "alive");
  
  MyApp->new_cow(name => "Daisy")->milk();

I realize this is a longer synopsis than most CPAN modules give, but considering it sets up six classes and three roles with some attributes and methods, applies the roles to the classes, and creates a type library with nine types in it, it's pretty concise.

DESCRIPTION

MooX::Press (pronounced "Moo Express") is a quick way of creating a bunch of simple Moo classes and roles at once without needing to create separate Perl modules for each class and each role, and without needing to add a bunch of boilerplate to each file.

It also supports Moose and Mouse, though Moo classes and roles play nicely with Moose (and to a certain extent with Mouse) anyway.

Import Options

MooX::Press is called like:

  use MooX::Press %import_opts;

The following options are supported. To make these easier to remember, options follow the convention of using lower-case singular, and reusing keywords from Perl and Moo/Moose/Mouse when possible.

class (OptList)

This is the list of classes to create as an optlist. An optlist is an arrayref of strings, where each string is optionally followed by a reference.

  [ "A", "B", "C", \%opt_for_C, "D", "E", \%opts_for_E, "F" ]

In particular, for the class optlist the references should be hashrefs of class options (see "Class Options"), though key-value pair arrayrefs are also accepted.

role (OptList)

This is the list of roles to create, structured almost the same as the optlist for classes, but see "Role Options".

toolkit (Str)

The strings "Moo", "Moose", or "Mouse" are accepted and instruct MooX::Press to use your favourite OO toolkit. "Moo" is the default.

version (Num)

This has nothing to do with the version of MooX::Press you are using. It sets the our $VERSION variable for the classes and roles being generated.

authority (Str)

This sets the our $AUTHORITY variable for the classes and roles being generated.

version and authority will be copied from the caller if they are not set, but you can set them to undef explicitly if you want to avoid that.

prefix (Str|Undef)

A namespace prefix for MooX::Press to put all your classes into. If MooX::Press is told to create a class "Animal" and prefix is set to "MyApp::OO", then it will create a class called "MyApp::OO::Animal".

This is optional and defaults to the caller. If you wish to have no prefix, then pass an explicit prefix => undef option.

You can bypass the prefix for a specific class or a specific role using a leading double colon, like "::Animal".

factory_package (Str|Undef)

A package name to install methods like the new_cat and new_cow methods in "SYNOPSIS".

This defaults to caller, but may be explicitly set to undef to suppress the creation of such methods.

In every class (but not role) that MooX::Press builds, there will be a FACTORY method created so that, for example

  MyApp::Cow->FACTORY  # returns "MyApp"
type_library (Str|Undef)

MooX::Press will automatically create a Type::Library-based type library with type constraints for all your classes and roles. It will be named using your prefix followed by "::Types".

You can specify a new name or explicitly set to undef to suppress this behaviour, but a lot of the coercion features of MooX::Press rely on there being a type library.

MooX::Press will create a get_type_for_package method that allows you to do this:

  MyApp::Types->get_type_for_package(class => "MyApp::Animal")

MooX::Press will mark "MyApp/Types.pm" as loaded in %INC, so you can do things like:

  use MyApp::Types qw(Animal);

And it won't complain about "MyApp/Types.pm" not being found.

MooX::Press will install a type_library method into the factory package which returns the name of the type library, so you can do:

  MyApp->type_library->get_type_for_package(class => "MyApp::Animal")
caller (Str)

MooX::Press determines some things based on which package called it. If you are wrapping MooX::Press, you can fake the caller by passing it as an option.

end (CodeRef)

After creating each class or role, this coderef will be called. It will be passed two parameters; the fully-qualified package name of the class or role, plus the string "class" or "role" as appropriate.

Optional; defaults to nothing.

mutable (Bool)

Boolean to indicate that classes should be left mutable after creating them rather than making them immutable. Constructors for mutable classes are considerably slower than for immutable classes, so this is usually a bad idea.

Only supported for Moose. Unnecessary for Moo anyway. Defaults to false.

At this top level, a shortcut is available for the 'class' and 'role' keys. Rather than:

  use MooX::Press (
    role => [
      'Quux',
      'Quuux' => { ... },
    ],
    class => [
      'Foo',
      'Bar' => { ... },
      'Baz' => { ... },
    ],
  );

It is possible to write:

  use MooX::Press (
    'role:Quux'  => {},
    'role:Quuux' => { ... },
    'class:Foo'  => {},
    'class:Bar'  => { ... },
    'class:Baz'  => { ... },
  );

This saves a level of indentation. (=> undef or => 1 are supported as synonyms for => {}.)

Class Options

Each class in the list of classes can be followed by a hashref of options:

  use MooX::Press (
    class => [
      'Foo' => \%options_for_foo,
      'Bar' => \%options_for_bar,
    ],
  );

The following class options are supported.

extends (Str|ArrayRef[Str])

The parent class for this class.

The prefix is automatically added. Include a leading "::" if you don't want the prefix to be added.

Multiple inheritance is supported.

with (ArrayRef[Str])

Roles for this class to consume.

The prefix is automatically added. Include a leading "::" if you don't want the prefix to be added.

has (OptList)

The list of attributes to add to the class as an optlist.

The strings are the names of the attributes, but these strings may be "decorated" with sigils and suffixes:

$foo

Creates an attribute "foo" intended to hold a single value. This adds a type constraint forbidding arrayrefs and hashrefs but allowing any other value, including undef, strings, numbers, and any other reference.

@foo

Creates an attribute "foo" intended to hold a list of values. This adds a type constraint allowing arrayrefs or objects overloading @{}.

%foo

Creates an attribute "foo" intended to hold a collection of key-value pairs. This adds a type constraint allowing hashrefs or objects overloading %{}.

foo!

Creates an attribute "foo" which will be required by the constructor.

An attribute can have both a sigil and a suffix.

The references in the optlist may be attribute specification hashrefs, type constraint objects, or builder coderefs.

  # These mean the same thing...
  "name!" => Str,
  "name"  => { is => "rw", required => 1, isa => Str },

  # These mean the same thing...
  "age"   => sub { return 0 },
  "age"   => {
    is         => "rw",
    lazy       => 1,
    builder    => sub { return 0 },
    clearer    => "clear_age",
  },

Type constraints can be any blessed object supported by the toolkit. For Moo, use Type::Tiny. For Moose, use Type::Tiny, MooseX::Types, or Specio. For Mouse, use Type::Tiny or MouseX::Types.

Builder coderefs are automatically installed as methods like "YourPrefix::YourClass::_build_age()".

For details of the hashrefs, see "Attribute Specifications".

can (HashRef[CodeRef])

A hashref of coderefs to install into the package.

  package MyApp;
  use MooX::Press (
    class => [
      'Foo' => {
         can => {
           'bar' => sub { print "in bar" },
         },
       },
    ],
  );
  
  package main;
  MyApp->new_foo()->bar();

As an alternative, you can do this to prevent your import from getting cluttered with coderefs. Which you choose depends a lot on stylistic preference.

  package MyApp;
  use MooX::Press (
    class => ['Foo'],
  );
  
  package MyApp::Foo;
  sub bar { print "in bar" },
  
  package main;
  MyApp->new_foo()->bar();
constant (HashRef[Item])

A hashref of scalar constants to define in the package.

  package MyApp;
  use MooX::Press (
    class => [
      'Foo' => {
         constant => {
           'BAR' => 42,
         },
       },
    ],
  );
  
  package main;
  print MyApp::Foo::BAR, "\n";
  print MyApp->new_foo->BAR, "\n";
around (ArrayRef|HashRef)
before (ArrayRef|HashRef)
after (ArrayRef|HashRef)

Installs method modifiers.

  package MyApp;
  use MooX::Press (
    role => [
      'Loud' => {
        around => [
          'greeting' => sub {
            my $orig = shift;
            my $self = shift;
            return uc( $self->$orig(@_) );
          },
        ],
      }
    ],
    class => [
      'Person' => {
        can => {
          'greeting' => sub { "hello" },
        }
        subclass => [
          'LoudPerson' => { with => 'Loud' },
        ],
      },
    ],
  );
  
  package main;
  print MyApp::LoudPerson->new->greeting, "\n";  # prints "HELLO"
coerce (ArrayRef)

When creating a class or role "Foo", MooX::Press will also create a Type::Tiny::Class or Type::Tiny::Role called "Foo". The coerce option allows you to add coercions to that type constraint. Coercions are called as methods on the class or role. This is perhaps best explained with an example:

  package MyApp;
  use Types::Standard qw(Str);
  use MooX::Press (
    class => [
      'Person' => {
        has    => [ 'name!' => Str ],
        can    => {
          'from_name' => sub {
            my ($class, $name) = @_;
            return $class->new(name => $name);
          },
        },
        coerce => [
          Str, 'from_name',
        ],
      },
      'Company' => {
        has    => [ 'name!' => Str, 'owner!' => { isa => 'Person' } ],
      },
    ],
  );

This looks simple but it's like the swan, graceful above the surface of the water, legs paddling frantically below.

It creates a class called "MyApp::Person" with a "name" attribute, so you can do this kind of thing:

  my $bob = MyApp::Person->new(name => "Bob");
  my $bob = MyApp->new_person(name => "Bob");

As you can see from the can option, it also creates a method "from_name" which can be used like this:

  my $bob = MyApp::Person->from_name("Bob");

But here's where coercions come in. It also creates a type constraint called "Person" in "MyApp::Types" and adds a coercion from the Str type. The coercion will just call the "from_name" method.

Then when the "MyApp::Company" class is created and the "owner" attribute is being set up, MooX::Press knows about the coercion from Str, and will set up coercion for that attribute.

  # So this should just work...
  my $acme = MyApp->new_company(name => "Acme Inc", owner => "Bob");
  print $acme->owner->name, "\n";

Now that's out of the way, the exact structure for the arrayref of coercions can be explained. It is essentially a list of type-method pairs.

The type may be either a blessed type constraint object (Type::Tiny, etc) or it may be a class or role name that is being set up by MooX::Press, in which case it will have the prefix added, etc.

The method is a string containing the method name to perform the coercion.

This may optionally be followed by coderef to install as the method. The following two examples are equivalent:

  use MooX::Press (
    class => [
      'Person' => {
        has    => [ 'name!' => Str ],
        can    => {
          'from_name' => sub {
            my ($class, $name) = @_;
            return $class->new(name => $name);
          },
        },
        coerce => [
          Str, 'from_name',
        ],
      },
    ],
  );

  use MooX::Press (
    class => [
      'Person' => {
        has    => [ 'name!' => Str ],
        coerce => [
          Str, 'from_name' => sub {
            my ($class, $name) = @_;
            return $class->new(name => $name);
          },
        ],
      },
    ],
  );

In the second example, you can see the can option to install the "from_name" method has been dropped and the coderef put into coerce instead.

In case it's not obvious, I suppose it's worth explicitly stating that it's possible to have coercions from many different types.

  use MooX::Press (
    class => [
      'Foo::Bar' => {
        coerce => [
          Str,        'from_string', sub { ... },
          ArrayRef,   'from_array',  sub { ... },
          HashRef,    'from_hash',   sub { ... },
          'Foo::Baz', 'from_foobaz', sub { ... },
        ],
      },
      'Foo::Baz',
    ],
  );

You should generally order the coercions from most specific to least specific. If you list "Num" before "Int", "Int" will never be used because all integers are numbers.

There is no automatic inheritance for coercions because that does not make sense. If Mammal->from_string($str) is a coercion returning a "Mammal" object, and "Person" is a subclass of "Mammal", then there's no way for MooX::Press to ensure that when Person->from_string($str) is called, it will return a "Person" object and not some other kind of mammal. If you want "Person" to have a coercion, define the coercion in the "Person" class and don't rely on it being inherited from "Mammal".

subclass (OptList)

Set up subclasses of this class. This accepts an optlist like the class list. It allows subclasses to be nested as deep as you like:

  package MyApp;
  use MooX::Press (
    class => [
      'Animal' => {
         has      => ['name!'],
         subclass => [
           'Fish',
           'Bird',
           'Mammal' => {
              can      => { 'lactate' => sub { ... } },
              subclass => [
                'Cat',
                'Dog',
                'Primate' => {
                  subclass => ['Monkey', 'Gorilla', 'Human'],
                },
              ],
           },
         ],
       },
    ];
  );
  
  package main;
  my $uncle = MyApp->new_human(name => "Bob");
  $uncle->isa('MyApp::Human');    # true
  $uncle->isa('MyApp::Primate');  # true
  $uncle->isa('MyApp::Mammal');   # true
  $uncle->isa('MyApp::Animal');   # true
  $uncle->isa('MyApp::Bird');     # false
  $uncle->can('lactate');         # eww, but true

We just defined a nested heirarchy with ten classes there!

Subclasses can be named with a leading "+" to tell them to use their parent class name as a prefix. So, in the example above, if you'd called your subclasses "+Mammal", "+Dog", etc, you'd end up with packages like "MyApp::Animal::Mammal::Dog". (In cases of multiple inheritance, it uses $ISA[0].)

factory (Str)

This is the name for the method installed into the factory package. So for class "Cat", it might be "new_cat".

The default is the class name (excluding the prefix), lowercased, with double colons replaced by single underscores, and with "new_" added in front. To suppress the creation of this method, set factory to an explicit undef.

type_name (Str)

The name for the type being installed into the type library.

The default is the class name (excluding the prefix), with double colons replaced by single underscores.

This:

  use MooX::Press prefix => "ABC::XYZ", class => ["Foo::Bar"];

Will create class "ABC::XYZ::Foo::Bar", a factory method ABC::XYZ->new_foo_bar(), and a type constraint "Foo_Bar" in type library "ABC::XYZ::Types".

toolkit (Str)

Override toolkit choice for this class and any child classes.

version (Num)

Override version number for this class and any child classes.

authority (Str)

Override authority for this class and any child classes.

See "Import Options".

prefix (Str)

Override namespace prefix for this class and any child classes.

See "Import Options".

factory_package (Str)

Override factory_package for this class and any child classes.

See "Import Options".

mutable (Bool)

Override mutability for this class and any child classes.

See "Import Options".

end (CodeRef)

Override end for this class and any child classes.

See "Import Options".

Role Options

Options for roles are largely the same as for classes with the following exceptions:

extends (Any)

This option is disallowed.

can (HashRef[CodeRef])

The alternative style for defining methods may cause problems with the order in which things happen. Because use MooX::Press happens at compile time, the following might not do what you expect:

  package MyApp;
  use MooX::Press (
    role   => ["MyRole"],
    class  => ["MyClass" => { with => "MyRole" }],
  );
  
  package MyApp::MyRole;
  sub my_function { ... }

The "my_function" will not be copied into "MyApp::MyClass" because at the time the class is constructed, "my_function" doesn't yet exist within the role "MyApp::MyRole".

You can combat this by changing the order you define things in:

  package MyApp::MyRole;
  sub my_function { ... }
  
  package MyApp;
  use MooX::Press (
    role   => ["MyRole"],
    class  => ["MyClass" => { with => "MyRole" }],
  );

If you don't like having method definitions "above" MooX::Press in your file, then you can move them out into a module.

  # MyApp/Methods.pm
  #
  package MyApp::MyRole;
  sub my_function { ... }

  # MyApp.pm
  #
  package MyApp;
  use MyApp::Methods (); # load extra methods
  use MooX::Press (
    role   => ["MyRole"],
    class  => ["MyClass" => { with => "MyRole" }],
  );

Or force MooX::Press to happen at runtime instead of compile time.

  package MyApp;
  require MooX::Press;
  import MooX::Press (
    role   => ["MyRole"],
    class  => ["MyClass" => { with => "MyRole" }],
  );
  
  package MyApp::MyRole;
  sub my_function { ... }
  
subclass (Any)

This option is silently ignored.

factory (Any)

This option is silently ignored.

mutable (Any)

This option is silently ignored.

Attribute Specifications

Attribute specifications are mostly just passed to the OO toolkit unchanged, somewhat like:

  has $attribute_name => %attribute_spec;

So whatever specifications (required, trigger, coerce, etc) the underlying toolkit supports should be supported.

The following are exceptions:

is (Str)

This is optional rather than being required, and defaults to "rw". (Yes, I prefer "ro" generally, but whatever.)

isa (Str|Object)

When the type constraint is a string, it is always assumed to be a class name and your application's namespace prefix is added. So isa => "HashRef" doesn't mean what you think it means. It means an object blessed into the "YourApp::HashRef" class.

Use blessed type constraint objects, such as those from Types::Standard.

type (Str)

type => "HashRef" does what you think isa => "HashRef" should do. More specifically it searches your type library, along with Types::Standard, Types::Common::Numeric, and Types::Common::String to find the type constraint it thinks you wanted. It's smart enough to deal with parameterized types, unions, intersections, and complements.

coerce (Bool)

MooX::Press automatically implies coerce => 1 when you give a type constraint that has a coercion. If you don't want coercion then explicitly provide coerce => 0.

does (Str)

Similarly, these will be given your namespace prefix.

enum (ArrayRef[Str])

This is a cute shortcut for an enum type constraint.

  # These mean the same...
  enum => ['foo', 'bar'],
  isa  => Types::Standard::Enum['foo', 'bar'],

Optimization Features

MooX::Press will automatically load MooX::TypeTiny if it's installed, which optimizes how Type::Tiny constraints and coercions are inlined into Moo constructors. This is only used for Moo classes.

MooX::Press will automatically load MooseX::XSAccessor if it's installed, which speeds up some Moose accessors. This is only used for Moose classes.

Subclassing MooX::Press

All the internals of MooX::Press are called as methods, which should make subclassing it possible.

  package MyX::Press;
  use parent 'MooX::Press';
  use Class::Method::Modifiers;
  
  around make_class => sub {
    my $orig = shift;
    my $self = shift;
    my ($name, %opts) = @_;
    ## Alter %opts here
    my $qname = $self->$orig($name, %opts);
    ## Maybe do something to the returned class
    return $qname;
  };

It is beyond the scope of this documentation to fully describe all the methods you could potentially override, but here is a quick summary of some that may be useful.

import(%opts|\%opts)
qualify_name($name, $prefix)
croak($error)
prepare_type_library($qualified_name)
make_type_for_role($name, %opts)
make_type_for_class($name, %opts)
make_role($name, %opts)
make_class($name, %opts)
install_methods($qualified_name, \%methods)
install_constants($qualified_name, \%values)

FAQ

This is a new module so I haven't had any questions about it yet, let alone any frequently asked ones, but I will anticipate some.

Why doesn't MooX::Press automatically import strict and warnings for me?

Your MooX::Press import will typically contain a lot of strings, maybe some as barewords, some coderefs, etc. You should manually import strict and warnings before importing MooX::Press to ensure all of that is covered by strictures.

Why all the factory stuff?

Factories are big and cool and they put lots of smoke into our atmosphere.

Also, if you do something like:

  use constant APP => 'MyGarden';
  use MooX::Press (
    prefix => APP,
    role  => [
      'LeafGrower' => {
        has => [ '@leafs' => sub { [] } ],
        can => {
          'grow_leaf' => sub {
            my $self = shift;
            my $leaf = $self->FACTORY->new_leaf;
            push @{ $self->leafs }, $leaf;
            return $leaf;
          },
        },
      },
    ],
    class => [
      'Leaf',
      'Tree'  => { with => ['LeafGrower'] },
    ],
  );
  
  my $tree = APP->new_tree;
  my $leaf = $tree->grow_leaf;

And you will notice that the string "MyGarden" doesn't appear anywhere in the definitions for any of the classes and roles. The prefix could be changed to something else entirely and all the classes and roles, all the methods within them, would continue to work.

Whole collections of classes and roles now have portable namespaces. The same classes and roles could be used with different prefixes in different scripts. You could load two different versions of your API in the same script with different prefixes. The possibilities are interesting.

The plural of "leaf" is "leaves", right?

Yeah, but that sounds like something is leaving.

Are you insane?

Quite possibly.

BUGS

Please report any bugs to http://rt.cpan.org/Dist/Display.html?Queue=MooX-Press.

SEE ALSO

Moo, MooX::Struct, Types::Standard.

portable::loader.

AUTHOR

Toby Inkster <tobyink@cpan.org>.

COPYRIGHT AND LICENCE

This software is copyright (c) 2019 by Toby Inkster.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.

DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES

THIS PACKAGE IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTIBILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.