++ed by:
ABRAXXA ADAMJS ANTIPASTA AWNCORP BOWTIE

32 PAUSE user(s)
18 non-PAUSE user(s).

Toby Inkster

NAME

Type::Tiny::Manual::UsingWithMoose - how to use Type::Tiny and Type::Library with Moose

SYNOPSIS

   {
      package Person;
      
      use Moose;
      use Types::Standard qw( Str Int );
      use Type::Utils qw( declare as where inline_as coerce from );
      
      has name => (
         is      => "ro",
         isa     => Str,
      );
      
      my $PositiveInt = declare
         as        Int,
         where     {  $_ > 0  },
         inline_as { "$_ =~ /^[0-9]\$/ and $_ > 0" };
      
      coerce $PositiveInt, from Int, q{ abs $_ };
      
      has age => (
         is      => "ro",
         isa     => $PositiveInt,
         coerce  => 1,
         writer  => "_set_age",
      );
      
      sub get_older {
         my $self = shift;
         my ($years) = @_;
         $PositiveInt->assert_valid($years);
         $self->_set_age($self->age + $years);
      }
   }

DESCRIPTION

Type::Tiny type constraints have an API almost identical to that of Moose::Meta::TypeConstraint. It is also able to build a Moose::Meta::TypeConstraint constraint from a Type::Tiny constraint, and will do so automatically when needed. When Moose.pm is loaded, Type::Tiny will use Perl's AUTOLOAD feature to proxy method calls through to the Moose::Meta::TypeConstraint object. In short, you can use a Type::Tiny object pretty much anywhere you'd use a Moose::Meta::TypeConstraint and you are unlikely to notice the difference.

Per-Attribute Coercions

Type::Tiny offers convenience methods to alter the list of coercions associated with a type constraint. Let's imagine we wish to allow our name attribute to be coerced from an arrayref of strings.

      has name => (
         is      => "ro",
         isa     => Str->plus_coercions(
            ArrayRef[Str], sub { join " ", @{$_} },
         ),
         coerce  => 1,
      );

This coercion will apply to the name attribute only; other attributes using the Str type constraint will be unaffected.

See the documentation for plus_coercions, minus_coercions and no_coercions in Type::Tiny.

Optimization

The usual advice for optimizing type constraints applies: use type constraints which can be inlined whenever possible.

Defining coercions as strings rather than coderefs won't give you as much of a boost with Moose as it does with Moo, because Moose doesn't inline coercion code. However, it should still improve performance somewhat because it allows Type::Coercion to do some internal inlining.

SEE ALSO

For examples using Type::Tiny with Moose see the SYNOPSIS sections of Type::Tiny and Type::Library, and the files moose.t, moose-coercion.t and moo-inflation.t in the Type-Tiny test suite.

AUTHOR

Toby Inkster <tobyink@cpan.org>.

COPYRIGHT AND LICENCE

This software is copyright (c) 2013 by Toby Inkster.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.

DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES

THIS PACKAGE IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTIBILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.




Hosting generously
sponsored by Bytemark