#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
# PODNAME: uni
# ABSTRACT: command-line utility to find or display Unicode characters

use App::Uni;
use Encode qw(decode);

binmode STDOUT, ':encoding(utf-8)';

@ARGV = map {; decode('UTF-8', $_) } @ARGV;

App::Uni->run(@ARGV);

#pod =head1 DESCRIPTION
#pod
#pod   $ uni ☺
#pod   263A ☺ WHITE SMILING FACE
#pod
#pod   # Only on Perl 5.14+
#pod   $ uni wry
#pod   1F63C <U+1F63C> CAT FACE WITH WRY SMILE
#pod
#pod F<uni> has several modes of operation:
#pod
#pod =head2 DWIM Mode
#pod
#pod By default, F<uni> will interpret your arguments usefully.  If the only
#pod argument is a single character, it will be looked up.  Otherwise, it will work
#pod in name search mode, with the exception that search terms comprised entirely
#pod of hex digits are allowed to match against the codepoint's numeric value.
#pod
#pod =head2 Single Character Mode
#pod
#pod   $ uni -s SINGLE-CHAR
#pod
#pod This will print out the name and codepoint of the character.
#pod
#pod   $ uni -s ¿
#pod   ¿ - U+000BF - INVERTED QUESTION MARK
#pod
#pod =head2 Name Search Mode
#pod
#pod   $ uni -n SOME /SEARCH/ TERMS
#pod
#pod This one will look for codepoints where each term appears as a (\b-bounded)
#pod word in the name. If the term is bounded by slashes, it's treated as a regular
#pod expression and is used to filter candidate codepoints by name.
#pod
#pod   $ uni -n roman five
#pod   Ⅴ - U+02164 - ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE
#pod   Ⅾ - U+0216E - ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE HUNDRED
#pod   ⅴ - U+02174 - SMALL ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE
#pod   ⅾ - U+0217E - SMALL ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE HUNDRED
#pod   ↁ - U+02181 - ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE THOUSAND
#pod
#pod =head2 String Decomposition
#pod
#pod   $ uni -c SOME STRINGS
#pod
#pod This prints out the codepoints in each string, with a blank line between each
#pod argument's codepoints.
#pod
#pod   $ uni -c Hey リコ
#pod   H - U+00048 - LATIN CAPITAL LETTER H
#pod   e - U+00065 - LATIN SMALL LETTER E
#pod   y - U+00079 - LATIN SMALL LETTER Y
#pod
#pod   リ- U+030EA - KATAKANA LETTER RI
#pod   コ- U+030B3 - KATAKANA LETTER KO
#pod
#pod =head2 Lookup By Codepoint
#pod
#pod   $ uni -u NUMBERS IN HEX
#pod
#pod This prints out the codepoint for each given hex value.
#pod
#pod   $ uni -u FF 1FF 10FF
#pod   ÿ - U+000FF - LATIN SMALL LETTER Y WITH DIAERESIS
#pod   ǿ - U+001FF - LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH STROKE AND ACUTE
#pod   ჿ - U+010FF - GEORGIAN LETTER LABIAL SIGN
#pod
#pod =head1 NOTES
#pod
#pod If you'd like to search for Emojis in Unicode 6.0, please upgrade to Perl 5.14!
#pod
#pod =head1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
#pod
#pod This is a re-implementation of a program written by Audrey Tang in Taiwan.  I
#pod used that program for years before deciding I wanted to add a few features,
#pod which I did by rewriting from scratch.
#pod
#pod That program, in turn, was a re-implementation of a same-named program Larry
#pod copied to me, which accompanied Audrey for years.  However, that program was
#pod lost during a hard disk failure, so she coded it up from memory.
#pod
#pod Thank-you, Larry, for everything. ♡

__END__

=pod

=encoding UTF-8

=head1 NAME

uni - command-line utility to find or display Unicode characters

=head1 VERSION

version 9.004

=head1 DESCRIPTION

  $ uni ☺
  263A ☺ WHITE SMILING FACE

  # Only on Perl 5.14+
  $ uni wry
  1F63C <U+1F63C> CAT FACE WITH WRY SMILE

F<uni> has several modes of operation:

=head2 DWIM Mode

By default, F<uni> will interpret your arguments usefully.  If the only
argument is a single character, it will be looked up.  Otherwise, it will work
in name search mode, with the exception that search terms comprised entirely
of hex digits are allowed to match against the codepoint's numeric value.

=head2 Single Character Mode

  $ uni -s SINGLE-CHAR

This will print out the name and codepoint of the character.

  $ uni -s ¿
  ¿ - U+000BF - INVERTED QUESTION MARK

=head2 Name Search Mode

  $ uni -n SOME /SEARCH/ TERMS

This one will look for codepoints where each term appears as a (\b-bounded)
word in the name. If the term is bounded by slashes, it's treated as a regular
expression and is used to filter candidate codepoints by name.

  $ uni -n roman five
  Ⅴ - U+02164 - ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE
  Ⅾ - U+0216E - ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE HUNDRED
  ⅴ - U+02174 - SMALL ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE
  ⅾ - U+0217E - SMALL ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE HUNDRED
  ↁ - U+02181 - ROMAN NUMERAL FIVE THOUSAND

=head2 String Decomposition

  $ uni -c SOME STRINGS

This prints out the codepoints in each string, with a blank line between each
argument's codepoints.

  $ uni -c Hey リコ
  H - U+00048 - LATIN CAPITAL LETTER H
  e - U+00065 - LATIN SMALL LETTER E
  y - U+00079 - LATIN SMALL LETTER Y

  リ- U+030EA - KATAKANA LETTER RI
  コ- U+030B3 - KATAKANA LETTER KO

=head2 Lookup By Codepoint

  $ uni -u NUMBERS IN HEX

This prints out the codepoint for each given hex value.

  $ uni -u FF 1FF 10FF
  ÿ - U+000FF - LATIN SMALL LETTER Y WITH DIAERESIS
  ǿ - U+001FF - LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH STROKE AND ACUTE
  ჿ - U+010FF - GEORGIAN LETTER LABIAL SIGN

=head1 NOTES

If you'd like to search for Emojis in Unicode 6.0, please upgrade to Perl 5.14!

=head1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This is a re-implementation of a program written by Audrey Tang in Taiwan.  I
used that program for years before deciding I wanted to add a few features,
which I did by rewriting from scratch.

That program, in turn, was a re-implementation of a same-named program Larry
copied to me, which accompanied Audrey for years.  However, that program was
lost during a hard disk failure, so she coded it up from memory.

Thank-you, Larry, for everything. ♡

=head1 AUTHOR

Ricardo Signes <rjbs@cpan.org>

=head1 COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE


Ricardo Signes has dedicated the work to the Commons by waiving all of his
or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or
neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by
law.

Works under CC0 do not require attribution. When citing the work, you should
not imply endorsement by the author.

=cut