NAME

Text::ASCIITable::EasyTable - create ASCII tables from an array of hashes

SYNOPSIS

 use Text::ASCIITable::EasyTable;

 my $data = [
   { col1 => 'foo', col2 => 'bar' },
   { col1 => 'biz', col2 => 'buz' },
   { col1 => 'fuz', col2 => 'biz' },
 ];

 # easy
 my %index = ( ImageId => 'col1', Name => 'col2' );

 my $rows = [
   ImageId => sub { shift->{ $index{ shift() } } },
   Name    => sub { shift->{ $index{ shift() } } },
 ];
 
 print easy_table(
   data          => $data,
   rows          => $rows,
   table_options => { headerText => 'My Easy Table' },
 );

 # easier 
 print easy_table(
   data          => $data,
   columns       => [ sort keys %{ $data->[0] } ],
   table_options => { headerText => 'My Easy Table' },
 );
 
 # easiest 
 print easy_table( data => $data );

DESCRIPTION

Text::ASCIITable is one of my favorite modules when I'm writing command line scripts that sometimes need to output data in tabular format. It's so useful that I wanted to encourage myself to use it more often. Although, it is quite easy to use already I thought it could be easier.

Features

  • Easily create ASCII tables using Text::ASCIITable from arrays of hashes.

  • Define custom columns names (instead of the key names) that also allow you to set the order of the data to be displayed in the table.

  • Transform each element of the hash prior to insertion into the table.

  • Sort rows by individual columns in the hashes

  • Output JSON instead of a tableInstead of rendering a table, easy_table can apply the same type of transformations to arrays of hashes and subsequently output JSON.

Exports one method easy_table.

METHODS AND SUBROUTINES

easy_table

rows

Array (not hash) of key/value pairs where the key is the name of one of the columns in the table and the value is either a subroutine reference that returns the value of for that column, an undefined value, or the name of a key in the hash that contains the value for that column.

 my $rows = [
   ID   => 'InstanceId',
   Name => sub { uc shift->{ImageName} },
   ];
  • If the value provided for the column name key is a subroutine, it will be called with the hash for the current row being rendered and the column name.

  • If the value is undefined then the value for that column will be the value of the hash member using the column name as the key.

  • If the value is not a code reference, then that value is assumed to be the key to retrieve the value from the hash that will be inserted into table.

rows is an array, not a hash in order to preserve the order of the columns.

columns

Array of column names that can represent both the keys that will be used to extract data from the hash for each row and the labels for each column.

data

Array of hashes that contain the data for the table.

json

Instead of a table, return a JSON representation. The point here, is to use the transformation capabilities but rather than rendering a table, output JSON. Using this option you can transform the keys or the values of arrays of hashes using the same techniques you would use to transform the column names and column values in a table.

 my $data = [
   { col1 => 'foo', col2 => 'bar' },
   { col1 => 'biz', col2 => 'buz' },
   { col1 => 'fuz', col2 => 'biz' },
 ];
 
 my %index = ( ImageId => 'col1', Name => 'col2' );

 # dumb example, but the point is to transform 'some' of the data
 # in a non-trivial way
 my $rows = [
   ImageId => sub { uc shift->{ $index{ shift() } } },
   Name    => sub { uc shift->{ $index{ shift() } } },
 ];
 
 print easy_table(
   json => 1,
   data => $data,
   rows => $rows,
 );

 [
    {
       "ImageId" : "foo",
       "Name" : "bar"
    },
    {
       "Name" : "buz",
       "ImageId" : "biz"
    },
    {
       "ImageId" : "fuz",
       "Name" : "biz"
    }
 ]
  • easy_table() is meant to be used on small data sets and may not be efficient when larger data sets are used.

max_rows

Maximum number of rows to render.

sort_key

Key in the hash to use for sorting the array prior to rendering. If sort_key is a CODE reference, that method will be called prior to rendering.

table_options

Same options as those supported by Text::ASCIITable.

If neither rows or columns is provided, the keys are assumed to be the column names. In that case the order in which the columns appear will be non-deterministic. If you want a specific order, provide the columns or rows parameters. If you just want to see some data and don't care about order, you can just send the data parameter and the method will more or less DWIM.

SEE ALSO

Text::ASCIITable, Term::ANSIColor

AUTHOR

Rob Lauer - <rlauer6@comcast.net>>

LICENSE AND COPYRIGHT

This module is free software. It may be used, redistributed and/or modified under the same terms as Perl itself.