package Regexp::Common::number;

use 5.10.0;

use strict;
use warnings;
no  warnings 'syntax';

use Config;
use Regexp::Common qw /pattern clean no_defaults/;

our $VERSION = '2017060201';


sub _croak {
    require Carp;
    goto &Carp::croak;
}

my $digits = join ("", 0 .. 9, "A" .. "Z");

sub int_creator {
    my $flags = $_ [1];
    my ($sep, $group, $base, $places, $sign) =
            @{$flags} {qw /-sep -group -base -places -sign/};

    # Deal with the bases.
    _croak "Base must be between 1 and 36" unless $base >=  1 &&
                                                  $base <= 36;
    my $chars = substr $digits, 0, $base;

    $sep = ',' if exists $flags -> {-sep} && !defined $flags -> {-sep};

    my $max = $group;
       $max = $2 if $group =~ /^\s*(\d+)\s*,\s*(\d+)\s*$/;

    my $quant = $places ? "{$places}" : "+";

    return $sep ? qq {(?k:(?k:$sign)(?k:[$chars]{1,$max}} .
                  qq {(?:$sep} . qq {[$chars]{$group})*))}
                : qq {(?k:(?k:$sign)(?k:[$chars]$quant))}
}

sub real_creator { 
    my ($base, $places, $radix, $sep, $group, $expon, $sign) =
            @{$_[1]}{-base, -places, -radix, -sep, -group, -expon, -sign};
    _croak "Base must be between 1 and 36"
           unless $base >= 1 && $base <= 36;
    $sep = ',' if exists $_[1]->{-sep}
               && !defined $_[1]->{-sep};
    if ($base > 14 && $expon =~ /^[Ee]$/) {$expon = 'G'}
    foreach ($radix, $sep, $expon) {$_ = "[$_]" if 1 == length}
    my $chars = substr $digits, 0, $base;
    return $sep
           ? qq {(?k:(?i)(?k:$sign)(?k:(?=$radix?[$chars])}              .
             qq {(?k:[$chars]{1,$group}(?:(?:$sep)[$chars]{$group})*)}   .
             qq {(?:(?k:$radix)(?k:[$chars]{$places}))?)}                .
             qq {(?:(?k:$expon)(?k:(?k:$sign)(?k:[$chars]+))|))}
           : qq {(?k:(?i)(?k:$sign)(?k:(?=$radix?[$chars])}              .
             qq {(?k:[$chars]*)(?:(?k:$radix)(?k:[$chars]{$places}))?)}  .
             qq {(?:(?k:$expon)(?k:(?k:$sign)(?k:[$chars]+))|))};
}
sub decimal_creator { 
    my ($base, $places, $radix, $sep, $group, $sign) =
            @{$_[1]}{-base, -places, -radix, -sep, -group, -sign};
    _croak "Base must be between 1 and 36"
           unless $base >= 1 && $base <= 36;
    $sep = ',' if exists $_[1]->{-sep}
               && !defined $_[1]->{-sep};
    foreach ($radix, $sep) {$_ = "[$_]" if 1 == length}
    my $chars = substr $digits, 0, $base;
    return $sep
           ? qq {(?k:(?i)(?k:$sign)(?k:(?=$radix?[$chars])}               .
             qq {(?k:[$chars]{1,$group}(?:(?:$sep)[$chars]{$group})*)}    .
             qq {(?:(?k:$radix)(?k:[$chars]{$places}))?))}
           : qq {(?k:(?i)(?k:$sign)(?k:(?=$radix?[$chars])}               .
             qq {(?k:[$chars]*)(?:(?k:$radix)(?k:[$chars]{$places}))?))}
}


pattern name   => [qw (num int -sep= -base=10 -group=3 -sign=[-+]?)],
        create => \&int_creator,
        ;

pattern name   => [qw (num real -base=10), '-places=0,',
                   qw (-radix=[.] -sep= -group=3 -expon=E -sign=[-+]?)],
        create => \&real_creator,
        ;

pattern name   => [qw (num decimal -base=10), '-places=0,',
                   qw (-radix=[.] -sep= -group=3 -sign=[-+]?)],
        create => \&decimal_creator,
        ;

sub real_synonym {
    my ($name, $base) = @_;
    pattern name   => ['num', $name, '-places=0,', '-radix=[.]',
                       '-sep=', '-group=3', '-expon=E', '-sign=[-+]?'],
            create => sub {my %flags = (%{$_[1]}, -base => $base);
                           real_creator (undef, \%flags);
                      }
            ;
}


real_synonym (hex => 16);
real_synonym (dec => 10);
real_synonym (oct =>  8);
real_synonym (bin =>  2);


#          2147483647  == 2^31 - 1
# 9223372036854775807  == 2^63 - 1
pattern name    => [qw (num square)],
        create  => sub {
            use re 'eval';
            my $sixty_four_bits = $Config {use64bitint};
            #
            # CPAN testers claim it fails on 5.8.8 and darwin 9.0.
            #
            my $num = $sixty_four_bits
                    ? '0*(?:(?:9(?:[0-1][0-9]{17}'  .
                             '|2(?:[0-1][0-9]{16}'  .
                             '|2(?:[0-2][0-9]{15}'  .
                             '|3(?:[0-2][0-9]{14}'  .
                             '|3(?:[0-6][0-9]{13}'  .
                             '|7(?:[0-1][0-9]{12}'  .
                             '|20(?:[0-2][0-9]{10}' .
                             '|3(?:[0-5][0-9]{9}'   .
                             '|6(?:[0-7][0-9]{8}'   .
                             '|8(?:[0-4][0-9]{7}'   .
                             '|5(?:[0-3][0-9]{6}'   .
                             '|4(?:[0-6][0-9]{5}'   .
                             '|7(?:[0-6][0-9]{4}'   .
                             '|7(?:[0-4][0-9]{3}'   .
                             '|5(?:[0-7][0-9]{2}'   .
                             '|80(?:[0-6])))))))))))))))))|[1-8]?[0-9]{0,18})'
                     : '0*(?:2(?:[0-0][0-9]{8}'  .
                           '|1(?:[0-3][0-9]{7}'  .
                           '|4(?:[0-6][0-9]{6}'  .
                           '|7(?:[0-3][0-9]{5}'  .
                           '|4(?:[0-7][0-9]{4}'  .
                           '|8(?:[0-2][0-9]{3}'  .
                           '|3(?:[0-5][0-9]{2}'  .
                           '|6(?:[0-3][0-9]{1}'  .
                           '|4[0-7])))))))))|1?[0-9]{1,9}';
            qr {($num)(?(?{length $^N && sqrt ($^N) == int sqrt ($^N)})|(?!))}
        },
        ;

pattern name    => [qw (num roman)],
        create  => '(?xi)(?=[MDCLXVI])
                         (?k:M{0,4}
                            (?:C[DM]|D?C{0,4})?
                            (?:X[LC]|L?X{0,4})?
                            (?:I[VX]|V?I{0,4})?)'
        ;

1;

__END__

=pod

=head1 NAME

Regexp::Common::number -- provide regexes for numbers

=head1 SYNOPSIS

    use Regexp::Common qw /number/;

    while (<>) {
        /^$RE{num}{int}$/                and  print "Integer\n";
        /^$RE{num}{real}$/               and  print "Real\n";
        /^$RE{num}{real}{-base => 16}$/  and  print "Hexadecimal real\n";
    }


=head1 DESCRIPTION

Please consult the manual of L<Regexp::Common> for a general description
of the works of this interface.

Do not use this module directly, but load it via I<Regexp::Common>.

=head2 C<$RE{num}{int}{-base}{-sep}{-group}{-places}{-sign}>

Returns a pattern that matches an integer.

If C<< -base => I<B> >> is specified, the integer is in base I<B>, with
C<< 2 <= I<B> <= 36 >>. For bases larger than 10, upper case letters
are used. The default base is 10.

If C<< -sep => I<P> >> is specified, the pattern I<P> is required as a
grouping marker within the number. If this option is not given, no
grouping marker is used.

If C<< -group => I<N> >> is specified, digits between grouping markers
must be grouped in sequences of exactly I<N> digits. The default value
of I<N> is 3.  If C<< -group => I<N,M> >> is specified, digits between
grouping markers must be grouped in sequences of at least I<N> digits,
and at most I<M> digits. This option is ignored unless the C<< -sep >>
option is used.

If C<< -places => I<N> >> is specified, the integer recognized must be
exactly I<N> digits wide. If C<< -places => I<N,M> >> is specified, the
integer must be at least I<N> wide, and at most I<M> characters. There
is no default, which means that integers are unlimited in size. This
option is ignored if the C<< -sep >> option is used.

If C<< -sign => I<P> >> is used, it's a pattern the leading sign has to
match. This defaults to C<< [-+]? >>, which means the number is optionally
preceded by a minus or a plus. If you want to match unsigned integers,
use C<< $RE{num}{int}{-sign => ''} >>.

For example:

 $RE{num}{int}                          # match 1234567
 $RE{num}{int}{-sep=>','}               # match 1,234,567
 $RE{num}{int}{-sep=>',?'}              # match 1234567 or 1,234,567
 $RE{num}{int}{-sep=>'.'}{-group=>4}    # match 1.2345.6789

Under C<-keep> (see L<Regexp::Common>):

=over 4

=item $1

captures the entire number

=item $2

captures the optional sign of the number

=item $3

captures the complete set of digits

=back

=head2 C<$RE{num}{real}{-base}{-radix}{-places}{-sep}{-group}{-expon}>

Returns a pattern that matches a floating-point number.

If C<-base=I<N>> is specified, the number is assumed to be in that base
(with A..Z representing the digits for 11..36). By default, the base is 10.

If C<-radix=I<P>> is specified, the pattern I<P> is used as the radix point for
the number (i.e. the "decimal point" in base 10). The default is C<qr/[.]/>.

If C<-places=I<N>> is specified, the number is assumed to have exactly
I<N> places after the radix point.
If C<-places=I<M,N>> is specified, the number is assumed to have between
I<M> and I<N> places after the radix point.
By default, the number of places is unrestricted.

If C<-sep=I<P>> specified, the pattern I<P> is required as a grouping marker
within the pre-radix section of the number. By default, no separator is
allowed.

If C<-group=I<N>> is specified, digits between grouping separators
must be grouped in sequences of exactly I<N> characters. The default value of
I<N> is 3.

If C<-expon=I<P>> is specified, the pattern I<P> is used as the exponential
marker.  The default value of I<P> is C<qr/[Ee]/>.

If C<-sign=I<P>> is specified, the pattern I<P> is used to match the 
leading sign (and the sign of the exponent). This defaults to C<< [-+]? >>,
means means that an optional plus or minus sign can be used.

For example:

 $RE{num}{real}                  # matches 123.456 or -0.1234567
 $RE{num}{real}{-places=>2}      # matches 123.45 or -0.12
 $RE{num}{real}{-places=>'0,3'}  # matches 123.456 or 0 or 9.8
 $RE{num}{real}{-sep=>'[,.]?'}   # matches 123,456 or 123.456
 $RE{num}{real}{-base=>3'}       # matches 121.102

Under C<-keep>:

=over 4

=item $1

captures the entire match

=item $2

captures the optional sign of the number

=item $3

captures the complete mantissa

=item $4

captures the whole number portion of the mantissa

=item $5

captures the radix point

=item $6

captures the fractional portion of the mantissa

=item $7

captures the optional exponent marker

=item $8

captures the entire exponent value

=item $9

captures the optional sign of the exponent

=item $10

captures the digits of the exponent

=back

=head2 C<$RE{num}{dec}{-radix}{-places}{-sep}{-group}{-expon}>

A synonym for C<< $RE{num}{real}{-base=>10}{...} >>

=head2 C<$RE{num}{oct}{-radix}{-places}{-sep}{-group}{-expon}>

A synonym for C<< $RE{num}{real}{-base=>8}{...} >>

=head2 C<$RE{num}{bin}{-radix}{-places}{-sep}{-group}{-expon}>

A synonym for C<< $RE{num}{real}{-base=>2}{...} >>

=head2 C<$RE{num}{hex}{-radix}{-places}{-sep}{-group}{-expon}>

A synonym for C<< $RE{num}{real}{-base=>16}{...} >>

=head2 C<$RE{num}{decimal}{-base}{-radix}{-places}{-sep}{-group}>

The same as C<$RE{num}{real}>, except that an exponent isn't allowed.
Hence, this returns a pattern matching I<decimal> numbers.

If C<-base=I<N>> is specified, the number is assumed to be in that base
(with A..Z representing the digits for 11..36). By default, the base is 10.

If C<-radix=I<P>> is specified, the pattern I<P> is used as the radix point for
the number (i.e. the "decimal point" in base 10). The default is C<qr/[.]/>.

If C<-places=I<N>> is specified, the number is assumed to have exactly
I<N> places after the radix point.
If C<-places=I<M,N>> is specified, the number is assumed to have between
I<M> and I<N> places after the radix point.
By default, the number of places is unrestricted.

If C<-sep=I<P>> specified, the pattern I<P> is required as a grouping marker
within the pre-radix section of the number. By default, no separator is
allowed.

If C<-group=I<N>> is specified, digits between grouping separators
must be grouped in sequences of exactly I<N> characters. The default value of
I<N> is 3.

For example:

 $RE{num}{decimal}                  # matches 123.456 or -0.1234567
 $RE{num}{decimal}{-places=>2}      # matches 123.45 or -0.12
 $RE{num}{decimal}{-places=>'0,3'}  # matches 123.456 or 0 or 9.8
 $RE{num}{decimal}{-sep=>'[,.]?'}   # matches 123,456 or 123.456
 $RE{num}{decimal}{-base=>3'}       # matches 121.102

Under C<-keep>:

=over 4

=item $1

captures the entire match

=item $2

captures the optional sign of the number

=item $3

captures the complete mantissa

=item $4

captures the whole number portion of the mantissa

=item $5

captures the radix point

=item $6

captures the fractional portion of the mantissa

=back

=head2 C<$RE{num}{square}>

Returns a pattern that matches a (decimal) square. Because Perl's
arithmetic is lossy when using integers over about 53 bits, this pattern
only recognizes numbers less than 9000000000000000, if one uses a
Perl that is configured to use 64 bit integers. Otherwise, the limit
is 2147483647. These restrictions were introduced in versions 2.116
and 2.117 of Regexp::Common. Regardless whether C<-keep> was set,
the matched number will be returned in C<$1>.

=head2 C<$RE{num}{roman}>

Returns a pattern that matches an integer written in Roman numbers.
Case doesn't matter. There is no unique way of writing Roman numerals,
but we will not match anything. We require the Roman numerals to 
list the symbols in order (largest first). The symbols for thousand
(C<< M >>), hundred (C<< C >>), ten (C<< X >>), and one (C<< I >>)
can not be repeated more than four times. The symbols for five hundred
(C<< D >>), fifty (C<< L >>), and five (C<< V >>) may not appear more
than once. A sequence of four repeated characters may also be written
as a subtraction: by using the repeated character just once, and have
it followed by the symbol which is 5 or 10 as large. So, four can be
written as C<< IIII >>, or as C<< IV >>, and nine may be written as
C<< VIIII >> or C<< IX >>. This corresponds to most modern uses of 
Roman numerals.

The largest number which will be matched is 4999, or 
C<< MMMMDCCCCLXXXXVIIII >>, or C<< MMMMCMXCIX >>.

Under C<-keep>, the number will be captured in $1.

=head1 SEE ALSO

L<Regexp::Common> for a general description of how to use this interface.

=head1 AUTHOR

Damian Conway (damian@conway.org)

=head1 MAINTENANCE

This package is maintained by Abigail S<(I<regexp-common@abigail.be>)>.

=head1 BUGS AND IRRITATIONS

Bound to be plenty.

For a start, there are many common regexes missing.
Send them in to I<regexp-common@abigail.be>.

=head1 LICENSE and COPYRIGHT

This software is Copyright (c) 2001 - 2017, Damian Conway and Abigail.

This module is free software, and maybe used under any of the following
licenses:

 1) The Perl Artistic License.     See the file COPYRIGHT.AL.
 2) The Perl Artistic License 2.0. See the file COPYRIGHT.AL2.
 3) The BSD License.               See the file COPYRIGHT.BSD.
 4) The MIT License.               See the file COPYRIGHT.MIT.

=cut