++ed by:
PLICEASE AERO ZMUGHAL

3 PAUSE users
2 non-PAUSE users.

Author image David Mertens
and 1 contributors

NAME

C::Blocks::Filter - base package for writing filters for C::Blocks

SYNOPSIS

If you want to see the actual code sent to the compiler, apply this module at the command-line:

 $ perl -MC::Blocks::Filter your-script.pl

Or include it in your script:

 use strict;
 use warnings;
 use C::Blocks;
 use C::Blocks::Filter;
 
 cblock {
     ... /* this code will be printed */
 }

You can apply your own filter function:

 # Replace loop {} with while(1) {}
 sub my_filter {
     s/loop/while(1)/g;
 }
 use C::Blocks::Filter qw(&my_filter);
 
 cblock {
     loop {
         ... infinite loop code...
         ... hopefully you have a break in here somewhere
     }
 }

Or you can write your own filter module:

 package My::Filter;
 use C::Blocks::Filter ();
 our @ISA = qw(C::Blocks::Filter); # for import/unimport
 
 # Your module must include this function:
 sub c_blocks_filter {
     s/loop/while(1)/g;
 }

You can then use that module:

 use strict;
 use warnings;
 use C::Blocks;
 use My::Filter;
 
 cblock {
     int i;
     for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
         printf("i = %d\n", i);
     }
     loop {
         i++;
         printf("i = %d\n", i);
         if (i > 20) break;
     }
 }

DESCRIPTION

C::Blocks supports lexically-scoped source filters. This module makes it easy to install source filters and write modules that serve as source filters.

Source filters are called without any arguments. The C code to be filtered is simply in $_, and the filter function should modify the contents of $_ directly. Any return value from the filter function will be ignored.

Writing a one-time filter

The simplest way to write a filter is to create a sub that modifies the contents of $_ however you want. Then, you install the filter by passing the string &your_filter_funcion as an argument to use C::Blocks::Filter. The ampersand is important! An example is given in the synopsis with my_filter.

One caveat with this approach: the sub must be defined before the C::Blocks block that uses it. The reason for this is that the funcion is called at code compile time. If your function is defined below the block, it will not have been compiled by the time it is needed. Unless you are using string evals, this means it needs to be defined "above" your block, or in some module that is used before your block.

Writing a reusable filter

If you want to write a filter that can be easily used in many different modules or scripts, it is easiest to create a filter module. Such a module needs to have an import method that correctly adds the package to the C::Blocks list of filter packages. The specific symantics are still subject to change, so the best future-proof way to do this is to have your filter module inherit from C::Blocks::Filter. Other than that, you simply need to provide a c_blocks_filter sub in your module. Note that your module must contain this function; it cannot inherit it from a parent module.