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Daisuke Maki
and 9 contributors

NAME

Catalyst::View::Xslate - Text::Xslate View Class

SYNOPSIS

    package MyApp::View::Xslate;
    use Moose;
    extends 'Catalyst::View::Xslate';

    1;

VIEW CONFIGURATION

You may specify the following configuration items in from your config file or directly on the view object.

catalyst_var

The name used to refer to the Catalyst app object in the template

template_extension

The suffix used to auto generate the template name from the action name (when you do not explicitly specify the template filename);

Do not confuse this with the suffix option, which is passed directly to the Text::Xslate object instance. This option works on the filename used for the initial request, while suffix controls what cascade and include directives do inside Text::Xslate.

content_charset

The charset used to output the response body. The value defaults to 'UTF-8'.

encode_body

By default, output will be encoded to content_charset. You can set it to 0 to disable this behavior. (you need to do this if you're using Catalyst::Plugin::Unicode::Encoding)

NOTE Starting with Catalyst version 5.90080 Catalyst will automatically encode to UTF8 any text like body responses. You should either turn off the body encoding step in this view using this attribute OR disable this feature in the application (your subclass of Catalyst.pm).

    MyApp->config(encoding => undef);

Failure to do so will result in double encoding.

Text::Xslate CONFIGURATION

The following parameters are passed to the Text::Xslate constructor. When reset during the life cyle of the Catalyst app, these parameters will cause the previously created underlying Text::Xslate object to be cleared

path

cache_dir

cache

escape

type

function

input_layer

module

syntax

verbose

suffix

Use this to enable TT2 compatible variable methods via Text::Xslate::Bridge::TT2 or Text::Xslate::Bridge::TT2Like

    package MyApp::View::Xslate;
    use Moose;
    extends 'Catalyst::View::Xslate';

    has '+module' => (
        default => sub { [ 'Text::Xslate::Bridge::TT2Like' ] }
    );

preload

Boolean flag indicating if templates should be preloaded. By default this is enabled.

Preloading templates will basically cutdown the cost of template compilation for the first hit.

expose_methods

Use this option to specify methods from the View object to be exposed in the template. For example, if you have the following View:

    package MyApp::View::Xslate;
    use Moose;
    extends 'Catalyst::View::Xslate';

    sub foo {
        my ( $self, $c, @args ) = @_;
        return ...; # do something with $self, $c, @args
    }

then by setting expose_methods, you will be able to use $foo() as a function in the template:

    <: $foo("a", "b", "c") # calls $view->foo( $c, "a", "b", "c" ) :>

expose_methods takes either a list of method names to expose, or a hash reference, in order to alias it differently in the template.

    MyApp::View::Xslate->new(
        # exposes foo(), bar(), baz() in the template
        expose_methods => [ qw(foo bar baz) ]
    );

    MyApp::View::Xslate->new(
        # exposes $foo_alias(), $bar_alias(), $baz_alias() in the template,
        # but they will in turn call foo(), bar(), baz(), on the view object.
        expose_methods => {
            foo => "foo_alias",
            bar => "bar_alias",
            baz => "baz_alias",
        }
    );

NOTE: you can mangle the process of building the exposed methods, see build_exposed_method.

METHODS

$view-process($c)>

Called by Catalyst.

$view-render($c, $template, \%vars)>

Renders the given $template using variables \%vars.

$template can be a template file name, or a scalar reference to a template string.

    $view->render($c, "/path/to/a/template.tx", \%vars );

    $view->render($c, \'This is a xslate template!', \%vars );

$view-preload_templates>

Preloads templates in $view->path.

$view-build_exposed_method>

Hook point for mangling the building process of exposed methods.

AUTHOR

Copyright (c) 2010 Daisuke Maki <daisuke@endeworks.jp>

LICENSE

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

See http://www.perl.com/perl/misc/Artistic.html