++ed by:
MICHIELB JAITKEN KEEDI

3 PAUSE users
3 non-PAUSE users.

Chase Whitener
and 1 contributors

NAME

Digest::Bcrypt - Perl interface to the bcrypt digest algorithm

SYNOPSIS

    #!/usr/bin/env perl
    use strict;
    use warnings;
    use utf8;
    use Digest;   # via the Digest module (recommended)

    my $bcrypt = Digest->new('Bcrypt', cost => 12, salt => 'abcdefgh♥stuff');
    # You can forego the cost and salt in favor of settings strings:
    my $bcrypt = Digest->new('Bcrypt', settings => '$2a$20$GA.eY03tb02ea0DqbA.eG.');

    # $cost is an integer between 1 and 31
    $bcrypt->cost(12);

    # $salt must be exactly 16 octets long
    $bcrypt->salt('abcdefgh♥stuff');
    # OR, for good, random salts:
    use Data::Entropy::Algorithms qw(rand_bits);
    $bcrypt->salt(rand_bits(16*8)); # 16 octets

    # You can forego the cost and salt in favor of settings strings:
    $bcrypt->settings('$2a$20$GA.eY03tb02ea0DqbA.eG.');

    # add some strings we want to make a secret of
    $bcrypt->add('some stuff', 'here and', 'here');

    my $digest = $bcrypt->digest;
    $digest = $bcrypt->hexdigest;
    $digest = $bcrypt->b64digest;

    # bcrypt's own non-standard base64 dictionary
    $digest = $bcrypt->bcrypt_b64digest;

    # Now, let's create a password hash and check it later:
    use Data::Entropy::Algorithms qw(rand_bits);
    my $bcrypt = Digest->new('Bcrypt', cost=>20, salt=>rand_bits(16*8));
    my $settings = $bcrypt->settings(); # save for later checks.
    my $pass_hash = $bcrypt->add('Some secret password')->digest;
    # much later, we can check a password against our hash via:
    my $bcrypt = Digest->new('Bcrypt', settings=>$settings);
    if ($bcrypt->add($value_from_user)->digest eq $known_pass_hash) {
        say "Your password matched";
    }
    else {
        say "Try again!";
    }

NOTICE

While maintenance for Digest::Bcrypt will continue, there's no reason to use Digest::Bcrypt when Crypt::Eksblowfish::Bcrypt already exists. We suggest that you use Crypt::Eksblowfish::Bcrypt instead.

DESCRIPTION

Digest::Bcrypt provides a Digest-based interface to the Crypt::Eksblowfish::Bcrypt library.

Please note that you must set a salt of exactly 16 octets in length, and you must provide a cost in the range 1..31.

ATTRIBUTES

Digest::Bcrypt implements the following attributes.

cost

    $bcrypt = $bcrypt->cost(20); # allows for method chaining
    my $cost = $bcrypt->cost();

An integer in the range 1..31, this is required.

See Crypt::Eksblowfish::Bcrypt for a detailed description of cost in the context of the bcrypt algorithm.

When called with no arguments, it will return the current cost.

salt

    $bcrypt = $bcrypt->salt('abcdefgh♥stuff'); # allows for method chaining
    my $salt = $bcrypt->salt();

    # OR, for good, random salts:
    use Data::Entropy::Algorithms qw(rand_bits);
    $bcrypt->salt(rand_bits(16*8)); # 16 octets

Sets the value to be used as a salt. Bcrypt requires exactly 16 octets of salt.

It is recommenced that you use a module like Data::Entropy::Algorithms to provide a truly randomized salt.

When called with no arguments, it will return the current salt.

settings

    $bcrypt = $bcrypt->settings('$2a$20$GA.eY03tb02ea0DqbA.eG.'); # allows for method chaining
    my $settings = $bcrypt->settings();

A settings string can be used to set the "salt" in Digest::Bcrypt and "cost" in Digest::Bcrypt automatically. Setting the settings will override any current values in your cost and salt attributes.

For details on the settings string requirements, please see Crypt::Eksblowfish::Bcrypt.

When called with no arguments, it will return the current settings string.

METHODS

Digest::Bcrypt inherits all methods from Digest::base and implements/overrides the following methods as well.

new

    my $bcrypt = Digest->new('Bcrypt', %params);
    my $bcrypt = Digest::Bcrypt->new(%params);
    my $bcrypt = Digest->new('Bcrypt', \%params);
    my $bcrypt = Digest::Bcrypt->new(\%params);

Creates a new Digest::Bcrypt object. It is recommended that you use the Digest module in the first example rather than using Digest::Bcrypt directly.

Any of the "ATTRIBUTES" in Digest::Bcrypt above can be passed in as a parameter.

add

    $bcrypt->add("a"); $bcrypt->add("b"); $bcrypt->add("c");
    $bcrypt->add("a")->add("b")->add("c");
    $bcrypt->add("a", "b", "c");
    $bcrypt->add("abc");

Adds data to the message we are calculating the digest for. All the above examples have the same effect.

b64digest

    my $digest = $bcrypt->b64digest;

Same as "digest", but will return the digest base64 encoded.

The length of the returned string will be 31 and will only contain characters from the ranges '0'..'9', 'A'..'Z', 'a'..'z', '+', and '/'

The base64 encoded string returned is not padded to be a multiple of 4 bytes long.

bcrypt_b64digest

    my $digest = $bcrypt->bcrypt_b64digest;

Same as "digest", but will return the digest base64 encoded using the alphabet that is commonly used with bcrypt.

The length of the returned string will be 31 and will only contain characters from the ranges '0'..'9', 'A'..'Z', 'a'..'z', '+', and '.'

The base64 encoded string returned is not padded to be a multiple of 4 bytes long.

Note: This is bcrypt's own non-standard base64 alphabet, It is not compatible with the standard MIME base64 encoding.

clone

    my $clone = $bcrypt->clone;

Creates a clone of the Digest::Bcrypt object, and returns it.

digest

    my $digest = $bcrypt->digest;

Returns the binary digest for the message. The returned string will be 23 bytes long.

hexdigest

    my $digest = $bcrypt->hexdigest;

Same as "digest", but will return the digest in hexadecimal form.

The length of the returned string will be 46 and will only contain characters from the ranges '0'..'9' and 'a'..'f'.

reset

    $bcrypt->reset;

Resets the object to the same internal state it was in when it was constructed.

SEE ALSO

Digest, Crypt::Eksblowfish::Bcrypt, Data::Entropy::Algorithms

AUTHOR

James Aitken jaitken@cpan.org

CONTRIBUTORS

  • Chase Whitener capoeira@cpan.org

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

This software is copyright (c) 2012 by James Aitken.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.