Zakariyya Mughal

NAME

Image::Leptonica::Func::bilinear

VERSION

version 0.04

bilinear.c

  bilinear.c

      Bilinear (4 pt) image transformation using a sampled
      (to nearest integer) transform on each dest point
           PIX      *pixBilinearSampledPta()
           PIX      *pixBilinearSampled()

      Bilinear (4 pt) image transformation using interpolation
      (or area mapping) for anti-aliasing images that are
      2, 4, or 8 bpp gray, or colormapped, or 32 bpp RGB
           PIX      *pixBilinearPta()
           PIX      *pixBilinear()
           PIX      *pixBilinearPtaColor()
           PIX      *pixBilinearColor()
           PIX      *pixBilinearPtaGray()
           PIX      *pixBilinearGray()

      Bilinear transform including alpha (blend) component
           PIX      *pixBilinearPtaWithAlpha()

      Bilinear coordinate transformation
           l_int32   getBilinearXformCoeffs()
           l_int32   bilinearXformSampledPt()
           l_int32   bilinearXformPt()

      A bilinear transform can be specified as a specific functional
      mapping between 4 points in the source and 4 points in the dest.
      It can be used as an approximation to a (nonlinear) projective
      transform, because for small warps it is very similar and
      it is more stable.  (Projective transforms have a division
      by a quantity that can get arbitrarily small.)

      We give both a bilinear coordinate transformation and
      a bilinear image transformation.

      For the former, we ask for the coordinate value (x',y')
      in the transformed space for any point (x,y) in the original
      space.  The coefficients of the transformation are found by
      solving 8 simultaneous equations for the 8 coordinates of
      the 4 points in src and dest.  The transformation can then
      be used to compute the associated image transform, by
      computing, for each dest pixel, the relevant pixel(s) in
      the source.  This can be done either by taking the closest
      src pixel to each transformed dest pixel ("sampling") or
      by doing an interpolation and averaging over 4 source
      pixels with appropriate weightings ("interpolated").

      A typical application would be to remove some of the
      keystoning due to a projective transform in the imaging system.

      The bilinear transform is given by specifying two equations:

          x' = ax + by + cxy + d
          y' = ex + fy + gxy + h

      where the eight coefficients have been computed from four
      sets of these equations, each for two corresponding data pts.
      In practice, for each point (x,y) in the dest image, this
      equation is used to compute the corresponding point (x',y')
      in the src.  That computed point in the src is then used
      to determine the dest value in one of two ways:

       - sampling: take the value of the src pixel in which this
                   point falls
       - interpolation: take appropriate linear combinations of the
                        four src pixels that this dest pixel would
                        overlap, with the coefficients proportional
                        to the amount of overlap

      For small warp, like rotation, area mapping in the
      interpolation is equivalent to linear interpolation.

      Typical relative timing of transforms (sampled = 1.0):
      8 bpp:   sampled        1.0
               interpolated   1.6
      32 bpp:  sampled        1.0
               interpolated   1.8
      Additionally, the computation time/pixel is nearly the same
      for 8 bpp and 32 bpp, for both sampled and interpolated.

FUNCTIONS

bilinearXformPt

l_int32 bilinearXformPt ( l_float32 *vc, l_int32 x, l_int32 y, l_float32 *pxp, l_float32 *pyp )

  bilinearXformPt()

      Input:  vc (vector of 8 coefficients)
              (x, y)  (initial point)
              (&xp, &yp)   (<return> transformed point)
      Return: 0 if OK; 1 on error

  Notes:
      (1) This computes the floating point location of the transformed point.
      (2) It does not check ptrs for returned data!

bilinearXformSampledPt

l_int32 bilinearXformSampledPt ( l_float32 *vc, l_int32 x, l_int32 y, l_int32 *pxp, l_int32 *pyp )

  bilinearXformSampledPt()

      Input:  vc (vector of 8 coefficients)
              (x, y)  (initial point)
              (&xp, &yp)   (<return> transformed point)
      Return: 0 if OK; 1 on error

  Notes:
      (1) This finds the nearest pixel coordinates of the transformed point.
      (2) It does not check ptrs for returned data!

getBilinearXformCoeffs

l_int32 getBilinearXformCoeffs ( PTA *ptas, PTA *ptad, l_float32 **pvc )

  getBilinearXformCoeffs()

      Input:  ptas  (source 4 points; unprimed)
              ptad  (transformed 4 points; primed)
              &vc   (<return> vector of coefficients of transform)
      Return: 0 if OK; 1 on error

  We have a set of 8 equations, describing the bilinear
  transformation that takes 4 points (ptas) into 4 other
  points (ptad).  These equations are:

          x1' = c[0]*x1 + c[1]*y1 + c[2]*x1*y1 + c[3]
          y1' = c[4]*x1 + c[5]*y1 + c[6]*x1*y1 + c[7]
          x2' = c[0]*x2 + c[1]*y2 + c[2]*x2*y2 + c[3]
          y2' = c[4]*x2 + c[5]*y2 + c[6]*x2*y2 + c[7]
          x3' = c[0]*x3 + c[1]*y3 + c[2]*x3*y3 + c[3]
          y3' = c[4]*x3 + c[5]*y3 + c[6]*x3*y3 + c[7]
          x4' = c[0]*x4 + c[1]*y4 + c[2]*x4*y4 + c[3]
          y4' = c[4]*x4 + c[5]*y4 + c[6]*x4*y4 + c[7]

  This can be represented as

           AC = B

  where B and C are column vectors

         B = [ x1' y1' x2' y2' x3' y3' x4' y4' ]
         C = [ c[0] c[1] c[2] c[3] c[4] c[5] c[6] c[7] ]

  and A is the 8x8 matrix

             x1   y1   x1*y1   1   0    0      0     0
              0    0     0     0   x1   y1   x1*y1   1
             x2   y2   x2*y2   1   0    0      0     0
              0    0     0     0   x2   y2   x2*y2   1
             x3   y3   x3*y3   1   0    0      0     0
              0    0     0     0   x3   y3   x3*y3   1
             x4   y4   x4*y4   1   0    0      0     0
              0    0     0     0   x4   y4   x4*y4   1

  These eight equations are solved here for the coefficients C.

  These eight coefficients can then be used to find the mapping
  (x,y) --> (x',y'):

           x' = c[0]x + c[1]y + c[2]xy + c[3]
           y' = c[4]x + c[5]y + c[6]xy + c[7]

  that are implemented in bilinearXformSampledPt() and
  bilinearXFormPt().

pixBilinear

PIX * pixBilinear ( PIX *pixs, l_float32 *vc, l_int32 incolor )

  pixBilinear()

      Input:  pixs (all depths; colormap ok)
              vc  (vector of 8 coefficients for bilinear transformation)
              incolor (L_BRING_IN_WHITE, L_BRING_IN_BLACK)
      Return: pixd, or null on error

  Notes:
      (1) Brings in either black or white pixels from the boundary
      (2) Removes any existing colormap, if necessary, before transforming

pixBilinearColor

PIX * pixBilinearColor ( PIX *pixs, l_float32 *vc, l_uint32 colorval )

  pixBilinearColor()

      Input:  pixs (32 bpp)
              vc  (vector of 8 coefficients for bilinear transformation)
              colorval (e.g., 0 to bring in BLACK, 0xffffff00 for WHITE)
      Return: pixd, or null on error

pixBilinearGray

PIX * pixBilinearGray ( PIX *pixs, l_float32 *vc, l_uint8 grayval )

  pixBilinearGray()

      Input:  pixs (8 bpp)
              vc  (vector of 8 coefficients for bilinear transformation)
              grayval (0 to bring in BLACK, 255 for WHITE)
      Return: pixd, or null on error

pixBilinearPta

PIX * pixBilinearPta ( PIX *pixs, PTA *ptad, PTA *ptas, l_int32 incolor )

  pixBilinearPta()

      Input:  pixs (all depths; colormap ok)
              ptad  (4 pts of final coordinate space)
              ptas  (4 pts of initial coordinate space)
              incolor (L_BRING_IN_WHITE, L_BRING_IN_BLACK)
      Return: pixd, or null on error

  Notes:
      (1) Brings in either black or white pixels from the boundary
      (2) Removes any existing colormap, if necessary, before transforming

pixBilinearPtaColor

PIX * pixBilinearPtaColor ( PIX *pixs, PTA *ptad, PTA *ptas, l_uint32 colorval )

  pixBilinearPtaColor()

      Input:  pixs (32 bpp)
              ptad  (4 pts of final coordinate space)
              ptas  (4 pts of initial coordinate space)
              colorval (e.g., 0 to bring in BLACK, 0xffffff00 for WHITE)
      Return: pixd, or null on error

pixBilinearPtaGray

PIX * pixBilinearPtaGray ( PIX *pixs, PTA *ptad, PTA *ptas, l_uint8 grayval )

  pixBilinearPtaGray()

      Input:  pixs (8 bpp)
              ptad  (4 pts of final coordinate space)
              ptas  (4 pts of initial coordinate space)
              grayval (0 to bring in BLACK, 255 for WHITE)
      Return: pixd, or null on error

pixBilinearPtaWithAlpha

PIX * pixBilinearPtaWithAlpha ( PIX *pixs, PTA *ptad, PTA *ptas, PIX *pixg, l_float32 fract, l_int32 border )

  pixBilinearPtaWithAlpha()

      Input:  pixs (32 bpp rgb)
              ptad  (4 pts of final coordinate space)
              ptas  (4 pts of initial coordinate space)
              pixg (<optional> 8 bpp, can be null)
              fract (between 0.0 and 1.0, with 0.0 fully transparent
                     and 1.0 fully opaque)
              border (of pixels added to capture transformed source pixels)
      Return: pixd, or null on error

  Notes:
      (1) The alpha channel is transformed separately from pixs,
          and aligns with it, being fully transparent outside the
          boundary of the transformed pixs.  For pixels that are fully
          transparent, a blending function like pixBlendWithGrayMask()
          will give zero weight to corresponding pixels in pixs.
      (2) If pixg is NULL, it is generated as an alpha layer that is
          partially opaque, using @fract.  Otherwise, it is cropped
          to pixs if required and @fract is ignored.  The alpha channel
          in pixs is never used.
      (3) Colormaps are removed.
      (4) When pixs is transformed, it doesn't matter what color is brought
          in because the alpha channel will be transparent (0) there.
      (5) To avoid losing source pixels in the destination, it may be
          necessary to add a border to the source pix before doing
          the bilinear transformation.  This can be any non-negative number.
      (6) The input @ptad and @ptas are in a coordinate space before
          the border is added.  Internally, we compensate for this
          before doing the bilinear transform on the image after
          the border is added.
      (7) The default setting for the border values in the alpha channel
          is 0 (transparent) for the outermost ring of pixels and
          (0.5 * fract * 255) for the second ring.  When blended over
          a second image, this
          (a) shrinks the visible image to make a clean overlap edge
              with an image below, and
          (b) softens the edges by weakening the aliasing there.
          Use l_setAlphaMaskBorder() to change these values.
      (8) A subtle use of gamma correction is to remove gamma correction
          before scaling and restore it afterwards.  This is done
          by sandwiching this function between a gamma/inverse-gamma
          photometric transform:
              pixt = pixGammaTRCWithAlpha(NULL, pixs, 1.0 / gamma, 0, 255);
              pixd = pixBilinearPtaWithAlpha(pixt, ptad, ptas, NULL,
                                             fract, border);
              pixGammaTRCWithAlpha(pixd, pixd, gamma, 0, 255);
              pixDestroy(&pixt);
          This has the side-effect of producing artifacts in the very
          dark regions.

pixBilinearSampled

PIX * pixBilinearSampled ( PIX *pixs, l_float32 *vc, l_int32 incolor )

  pixBilinearSampled()

      Input:  pixs (all depths)
              vc  (vector of 8 coefficients for bilinear transformation)
              incolor (L_BRING_IN_WHITE, L_BRING_IN_BLACK)
      Return: pixd, or null on error

  Notes:
      (1) Brings in either black or white pixels from the boundary.
      (2) Retains colormap, which you can do for a sampled transform..
      (3) For 8 or 32 bpp, much better quality is obtained by the
          somewhat slower pixBilinear().  See that function
          for relative timings between sampled and interpolated.

pixBilinearSampledPta

PIX * pixBilinearSampledPta ( PIX *pixs, PTA *ptad, PTA *ptas, l_int32 incolor )

  pixBilinearSampledPta()

      Input:  pixs (all depths)
              ptad  (4 pts of final coordinate space)
              ptas  (4 pts of initial coordinate space)
              incolor (L_BRING_IN_WHITE, L_BRING_IN_BLACK)
      Return: pixd, or null on error

  Notes:
      (1) Brings in either black or white pixels from the boundary.
      (2) Retains colormap, which you can do for a sampled transform..
      (3) No 3 of the 4 points may be collinear.
      (4) For 8 and 32 bpp pix, better quality is obtained by the
          somewhat slower pixBilinearPta().  See that
          function for relative timings between sampled and interpolated.

AUTHOR

Zakariyya Mughal <zmughal@cpan.org>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

This software is copyright (c) 2014 by Zakariyya Mughal.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.