++ed by:

1 non-PAUSE user.

Giles Lewis

NAME

ServiceNow::SOAP - A better Perl API for ServiceNow

SYNOPSIS

    # return a reference to a session object
    $sn = ServiceNow($instancename, $username, $password);
    
    # return a reference to a table object
    $table = $sn->table($tablename);

    # count records
    $count = $table->count(%parameters);
    
    # return a list of sys_ids
    @keys = $table->getKeys(%parameters);
    
    # return a single record as a hash
    $rec = $table->get(sys_id => $sys_id);
    
    # return a set of records as an array of hashes
    @recs = $table->getRecords(%parameters);

    # call getKeys and return a query object
    $qry = $table->query(%parameters);
    
    # fetch the next chunk of records
    @recs = $qry->fetch($numrecs);

    # retrieve a record based on a unique key other than sys_id
    $rec = $table->getRecord($name => $value);
    
    # insert a record
    $sys_id = $table->insert(%parameters);
    
    # insert multiple records
    @results = $table->insert(@records);
    
    # update a record
    $table->update(%parameters);
    

EXAMPLES

Create session and table objects.

    use ServiceNow::SOAP;
    
    my $sn = ServiceNow("mycompany", $username, $password);
    
    my $computer_tbl = $sn->table("cmdb_ci_computer");
    my $incident_tbl = $sn->table("incident");

Retrieve a small number of records.

    my @recs = $computer_tbl->getRecords(
        "location.name" => "London", 
        "operational_status" => "1",
        __order_by => "name", 
        __limit => 500);
    foreach my $rec (@recs) {
        print $rec->{name}, "\n";
    }
    

Count records.

    my $count = $computer_tbl->count(
        "location.name" => "London", 
        "operational_status" => "1");
    

Retrieve records in chunks.

    my $qry = $computer_tbl->query(
        "location.name" => "London", 
        "operational_status" => "1",
        __order_by => "name");
    while (@recs = $qry->fetch(200)) {
        foreach my $rec (@recs) {
            print $rec->{name}, "\n";
        }
    }
    

Retrieve all the records in a large table.

    my @recs = $computer_tbl->query()->fetchAll();
    

Insert a record.

    my $sys_id = $incident_tbl->insert(
        assignment_group => "Network Support",
        short_description => $short_description,
        impact => 2);

Retrieve a single record based on sys_id.

    my $rec = $incident_tbl->get($sys_id);
    print "number=", $rec->{number}, "\n";

Retrieve a single record based on number.

    my $rec = $incident_tbl->getRecord(number => $number);
    print "sys_id=", $rec->{sys_id}, "\n";
    

Update a record.

    $incident_tbl->update($sys_id,
        assigned_to => "Fred Luddy",
        incident_state => 2);
    

DESCRIPTION

This module provides access to ServiceNow via SOAP Web Services.

Features of this module include:

  • Support for both Direct Web Services and Scripted Web Services.

  • Simplified API which closely mirrors ServiceNow's Direct Web Services API documentation.

  • Robust methods for reading large amounts of data which adhere to ServiceNow's best practice recommendations.

EXPORTED FUNCTIONS

ServiceNow

This ServiceNow function (which is essentially an alias for ServiceNow::SOAP::Session->new()) is used to obtain a reference to a Session object. The Session object essentially holds the URL and connection credentials for your ServiceNow instance, and the SOAP::Lite object.

The first argument to this function is the instance, which can be either a fully qualified URL (e.g. "https://mycompanydev.service-now.com") or an instance name (e.g. "mycompanydev"). The second argument is the user name. The third argument is the password.

Various options can be specified as name/value pairs following the password. For a list of options refer to "set".

Syntax

    my $sn = ServiceNow($instance, $username, $password, %options);
    

Examples

The following two statements are equivalent.

    my $sn = ServiceNow("https://mycompanydev.service-now.com", "soap.perl", $password);
    my $sn = ServiceNow("mycompanydev", "soap.perl", $password);

Various options can be specified as name/value pairs following the password. Refer to "set" for details.

    my $sn = ServiceNow("mycompanydev", $username, $password, 
        query => 100000, trace => 1);
        

ServiceNow::SOAP::Session

call

This method is deprecated and will be removed in a future release. This is an alias for the execute method described below.

connect

Use of this method is optional, but sometimes you want to know up front whether your connection credentials are valid. This method tests them by attempting to get the user's profile from sys_user using getRecords, and trapping the error. If successful, the session object is returned. If unsuccessful, null is returned and the error message is in $@.

Syntax

    my $sn = ServiceNow($instancename, $username, $password)->connect()
        or die "Unable to connect to $instancename: $@";

execute

This method calls the "execute" function on a Scripted Web Service. The first argument is the name of the Scripted Web Service. This may be followed by input parameters which can be passed in as list of key/value pairs or as a hash reference. In a list context this method returns the output parameters as a list of key/value pairs. In a scalar context it returns the output parameters as a hash reference.

Use of this method requires the soap_script role and activation of the "Web Services Provider - Scripted" plugin.

Syntax

    my %outputs = $sn->execute($name, %inputs); # %inputs is a list or hash
    my $outputs = $sn->execute($name, $inputs); # $inputs is a hash reference

Examples

    my %outputs = $sn->execute('GetProperty', property => 'glide.product.description');
    my $value = $outputs{'property'};

    my $outputs = $sn->execute('InstanceInfo');
    my @keys = keys %{$outputs->{result}};
    foreach my $key (@keys) {
        my $value = $outputs->{result}->{$key};
        print "$key=$value\n";
    }
    

loadSession

This method loads the session information (i.e. cookies) from a file. This may be required if you are running the same perl script multiple times (each time in a separate process) and you do not want to establish a separate ServiceNow session each time the script is run. Use "saveSession" to save the session identifier to a file and this method to load the session identifier from the file.

Syntax

    $sn->loadSession($filename);
    

saveSession

This method saves the session information (i.e. cookies) to a file. For usage notes refer to "loadSession" above.

Syntax

    $sn->saveSession($filename);
    

set

This method permits assignment of various default values and processing options. The same options can also be specified following the password argument of "ServiceNow".

The following options may be specified.

  • dv - Specify a default value for Display Values. This can be overridden at the Table level by "setDV". For an explanation of values see "setDV". This option is only effective if it is changed prior to calling the "table" method.

  • fetch - Specify default number of records to be retrieved by "fetch". Default is 250. This option will be ignored if it is overridden by a parameter to "fetch" or "fetchAll".

  • query - Specify the number of keys to be retrieved by "query" in each call to "getKeys". The default is 0, which causes all keys to be retrieved in a single call.

  • timeout - Specify a SOAP::Transport::HTTP::Client timeout value.

  • trace - Specify a trace level. Refer to "DIAGNOSTICS" below. Default is 0.

Syntax

    $sn->set(%options);
    

Example

    $sn->set(query => 100000, trace => 1);

soap

This method returns a reference to the underlying SOAP::Lite object.

table

Used to obtain a reference to a Table object. The Table object is subsequently used for "ServiceNow::SOAP::Table" methods described below.

Syntax

    $table = $sn->table($tablename);

Example

    my $computer_tbl = $sn->table("cmdb_ci_computer");
    

ServiceNow::SOAP::Table

Table objects are used for ServiceNow's Direct Web Services API.

To obtain a Table object, use the "table" method describe above.

The following Table object methods provide access to Direct Web Services API methods of the same name: "deleteRecord", "get", "getKeys", "getRecords", "insert", "insertMultiple", "update".

addComment

This method adds a comment to a task.

See also: "getComments", "getJournalEntries"

Syntax

    $table->addComment($sys_id, $comment);
    

addWorkNote

This method adds a work note to a task.

See also: "getWorkNotes", "getJournalEntries"

Syntax

    $table->addWorkNote($sys_id, $work_note);
    

asQuery

This method creates a new Query object from a list of keys. It does not make any Web Services calls. It simply makes a copy of the list. Each item in the list must be a sys_id for the respective table.

Syntax

    $query = $table->asQuery(@keys);

Example

In this example, we assume that @incRecs contains an array of incident records from a previous query. We need an array of sys_user_group records for all referenced assignment groups. We use map to extract a list of assignment group keys from the @incRecs; grep to discard the blanks; and uniq to discard the duplicates. @grpKeys contains the list of sys_user_group keys. This array is then used to construct a new Query using "asQuery". "fetchAll" is used to retrieve the records.

    use List::MoreUtils qw(uniq);

    my @grpKeys = uniq grep { !/^$/ } map { $_->{assignment_group} } @incRecs;
    my @grpRecs = $sn->table("sys_user_group")->asQuery(@grpKeys)->fetchAll();
        

attachFile

If you are using Perl to create incident tickets, then you may have a requirement to attach files to those tickets.

This method implements the attachment creator API. The method requires soap_ecc role.

When you attach a file to a ServiceNow record, you can optionally specify an attachment name which is different from the actual file name. If no attachment name is specified, this function will assume that the attachment name is the the file name stripped of any directory.

You can also optionally specify a MIME type. If no type is specified, the function will use MIME::Types to infer the type.

This function will die if the file cannot be read.

Syntax

    $table->attachFile($sys_id, $filepath);
    $table->attachFile($sys_id, $filepath, $attachment_name, $mime_type);

Example

    $incident_tbl->attachFile($sys_id, "screenshot.png");
    

columns

This method returns a list of the columns in a table. The list is retrieved from the WSDL.

Syntax

    @columns = $table->columns();
    

count

This method counts the number of records in a table, or the number of records that match a set of parameters.

This method requres installation of the Aggregate Web Service plugin.

See also: "countBy"

Syntax

    $count = $table->count();
    $count = $table->count($encodedQuery);
    $count = $table->count(%parameters);

Examples

Count the total number of users:

    my $count = $sn->table("sys_user")->count();
    

Count the number of active users:

    my $count = $sn->table("sys_user")->count(active => true);
    

countBy

This method counts the number of records in a table using a GROUP_BY parameter, which must be the name of a column in the table. As with "count", an encoded query or set of filter parameters can be specified. The method returns a list of name/value pairs.

This method requres installation of the Aggregate Web Service plugin.

See also: "count"

Syntax

    %counts = $table->countBy($groupByColumn);
    %counts = $table->countBy($groupByColumn, $encodedQuery);
    %counts = $table->countBy(%groupByColumn, %parameters);

Example

    my %counts = $sn->table("incident")->countBy("category");
    foreach my $key (keys %counts) {
        my $count = $counts{$key};
        print "category: $key, count: $count\n";
    }

deleteRecord

This method deletes a record using the sys_id. For information on available parameters refer to the ServiceNow documentation on the "deleteRecord" Direct SOAP API method.

Syntax

    $table->deleteRecord(sys_id => $sys_id);
    $table->deleteRecord($sys_id);

except

This method returns a list of all columns in the table except those in the argument list. The argument(s) to this method can be either a string containing a comma separated list of names or a list of names (i.e. qw). This method returns a string containing a comma separated list of names.

The [only useful] purpose of this function is to that you can pass the result back in as an __exclude_columns extended query parameter.

See also: "exclude", "include"

Syntax

    $names = $table->except(@list_of_columns);
    $names = $table->except($comma_separated_list_of_columns);
    

Example

This example retrieves the columns sys_id, number and description from the incident table. In other words, the result excludes all columns except sys_id, number and description.

    my $incident_tbl = $sn->table("incident");
    my @recs = $incident_tbl->getRecords(
        __encoded_query => "sys_created_on>=$datetime",
        __exclude_columns => 
            $incident_tbl->except("sys_id,number,description"),
        __limit => 250);
 

get

This method retrieves a single record based on sys_id. The result is returned as a reference to a hash.

If no matching record is found then null is returned.

For additional information refer to the ServiceNow documentation on the "get" Direct SOAP API method.

Syntax

    $rec = $table->get(sys_id => $sys_id);
    $rec = $table->get($sys_id);

Example

    my $rec = $table->get($sys_id);
    print $rec->{name};
    

getComments

This method retrieves all comments for a task. It returns an array of records, each of which contains a value field.

See also: "addComment", "getJournalEntries"

Example

    my @comments = $incident_tbl->getComments($sys_id);
    foreach my $comment (@comments) {
        print $comment->{value}, "\n";
    }
    

getJournalEntries

This method retrieves journal fields (i.e. Work Notes, Comments) for a ticket.

See also: "getComments", "getWorkNotes"

Syntax

    @notes = $table->getJournalEntries($sys_id, $fieldname);
    

Example

    my @notes = $incident_tbl->getJournalEntries($sys_id, 'work_notes');
    foreach my $note (@notes) {
        print $note->{value}, "\n";
    }
    

getKeys

This method returns a list of keys.

Note that this method returns a list of keys, NOT a comma delimited string.

For additional information on available parameters refer to the ServiceNow documentation on the "getKeys" Direct SOAP API method.

Syntax

    @keys = $table->getKeys(%parameters);
    @keys = $table->getKeys($encodedquery);

Examples

    my $cmdb_ci_computer = $sn->table("cmdb_ci_computer");
    
    my @keys = $cmdb_ci_computer->getKeys(operational_status => 1, virtual => "false");
    # or
    my @keys = $cmdb_ci_computer->getKeys("operational_status=1^virtual=false");
    

getRecord

This method returns a single qualifying records. The method returns null if there are no qualifying records. The method will die if there are multiple qualifying records.

This method is typically used to retrieve a record based on number or name.

Syntax

    $rec = $table->getRecord(%parameters);
    $rec = $table->getRecord($encodedquery);
    

Example

This example retrieves a change_request record based on number.

    my $chgRec = $sn->table("change_request")->getRecord(number => $number);
    if ($chgRec) {
        print "Short description = ", $chgRec->{short_description}, "\n";
    }
    else {
        print "$number not found\n";
    }

The following two equivalent examples illustrate the relationship between "getRecord" and "getRecords".

    my @recs = $table->getRecords(%parameters);
    die "Too many records" if scalar(@recs) > 1;
    my $rec = $recs[0];

    my $rec = $table->getRecord(%parameters);

getRecords

This method returns a list of records. Actually, it returns a list of hash references. You may pass this method either a single encoded query string, or a list of name/value pairs.

For additional information on available parameters refer to the ServiceNow documentation on the "getRecords" Direct SOAP API method.

Important Note: This method will return at most 250 records, unless you specify a __limit parameter as documented in the ServiceNow wiki under Extended Query Parameters. For reading large amounts of data, it is recommended that you use the Query Object described below.

Syntax

    @recs = $table->getRecords(%parameters);
    @recs = $table->getRecords($encodedquery);

Example

    my $sys_user_group = $sn->table("sys_user_group");
    my @grps = $sys_user_group->getRecords(
        active => true, __limit => 500, __order_by => "name");
    foreach my $grp (@grps) {
        print $grp->{name}, "\n";
    }
    

getName

This method returns the name of this table from "table".

getVariables

This method returns a list of hashes of the variables attached to a Requested Item (RITM).

Note: This function currently works only for the sc_req_item table. This function requires read access to the three tables item_option_new, sc_item_option and sc_item_option_mtom.

Each hash contains the following five fields:

  • name - Name of the variable.

  • question - The question text.

  • reference - If the variable is a reference, then the name of the table. Otherwise blank.

  • value - Value of the question response. If the variable is a reference, then value will contain a sys_id.

  • order - Order (useful for sorting).

Syntax

    $sc_req_item = $sn->table("sc_req_item");
    @vars = $sc_req_item->getVariables($sys_id);
    

Example

    my $sc_req_item = $sn->table("sc_req_item");
    my $ritmRec = $sc_req_item->getRecord(number => $ritm_number);
    my @vars = $sc_req_item->getVariables($ritmRec->{sys_id});
    foreach my $var (sort { $a->{order} <=> $b->{order} } @vars) {
        my $name = $var->{name};
        my $value = $var->{value};
        print "$name = $value\n";
    }

getWorkNotes

This method retrieves all work notes for a task. It returns an array of records, each of which contains a value field.

See also: "addWorkNote", "getJournalEntries"

Example

    my @notes = $incident_tbl->getWorkNotes($sys_id);
    foreach my $note (@notes) {
        print $note->{value}, "\n";
    }
    

insert

This method inserts a record. In a scalar context, this method returns a sys_id only. In a list context, this method returns a list of name/value pairs.

For information on available parameters refer to the ServiceNow documentation on the "insert" Direct SOAP API method.

Syntax

    $sys_id = $table->insert(%values);
    %result = $table->insert(%values);
    

Examples

    my $incident_tbl = $sn->table("incident");

In a scalar context, the function returns a sys_id.

    my $sys_id = $incident_tbl->insert(
        short_description => $short_description,
        assignment_group => "Network Support",
        impact => 3);
    print "sys_id=", $sys_id, "\n";

In a list context, the function returns a list of name/value pairs.

    my %result = $incident_tbl->insert(
        short_description => $short_description,
        assignment_group => "Network Support",
        impact => 3);
    print "number=", $result{number}, "\n";
    print "sys_id=", $result{sys_id}, "\n";

You can also call it this way:

    my %rec;
    $rec{short_description} = $short_description;
    $rec{assignment_group} = "Network Support";
    $rec{impact} = 3;
    my $sys_id = $incident_tbl->insert(%rec);

Note that for reference fields (e.g. assignment_group, assigned_to) you may pass in either a sys_id or a display value.

insertMultiple

This method inserts multiple records. The input is an array of hash references. It returns an array of hash references.

This method requires installation of the ServiceNow Insert Multiple Web Services Plugin.

For additional information refer to the ServiceNow documentation on the "insertMultiple" Direct SOAP API method.

Syntax

    @results = $table->insertMultiple(@records);

Example

    my $incident_tbl = $sn->table("incident");
    my @allrecs;
    foreach my $descr (@descriptions) {
        my $newrec = {
            short_description => $desc,
            assignment_group => $groupName,
            description => $desc,
            impact => 3};
        push @allrecs, $newrec;
    }
    my @results = $incident_tbl->insertMultiple(@allrecs);
    foreach my $result (@results) {
        print "inserted ", $result->{number}, "\n";
    }

query

This method creates a new Query object by calling "getKeys". You can then use "fetch" or "fetchAll" to retrieve the actual record.

This method normally fetches all keys using a single call to "getKeys". However, if the number of keys is too large you may encounter timeout errors. In this situation the recommendation is to fetch the keys in chunks by specifying a query option in the "ServiceNow" function. The suggested initial setting is query => 100000. If timeouts are still a problem then reduce the value further.

Syntax

    $query = $table->query(%parameters);
    $query = $table->query($encodedquery);
    

Example

The following example builds a list of all Incidents created between 1/1/2014 and 2/1/2014 sorted by creation date/time. The "fetchAll" method fetches chunks of records until all records have been retrieved.

    my $filter = "sys_created_on>=2014-01-01^sys_created_on<2014-02-01";
    my $qry = $sn->table("incident")->query(
        __encoded_query => $filter,
        __order_by => "sys_created_on");
    my @recs = $qry->fetchAll();

The following example retrieves all keys for the cmdb_ci table in chunks of 100,000 at a time.

    my $sn = ServiceNow($instance, $user, $pass, query => 100000);
    my $cmdb_ci_tbl = $sn->table("cmdb_ci");
    my $qry = $cmdb_ci_tbl->query();

setDV

Used to enable (or disable) display values in queries. All subsequent calls to "get", "getRecords" or "getRecord" for this table will be affected. This method returns the modified Table object.

For additional information regarding display values refer to the ServiceNow documentation on "Return Display Value for Reference Variables".

Syntax

    $table->setDv("");     # return sys_id only (default)
    $table->setDV("true"); # return display value instead of sys_id
    $table->setDV("all");  # return both sys_id and display value
    $table->setDV(0);      # same as ""
    $table->setDV(1);      # same as "true"
    $table->setDV(2);      # same as "all"

Examples

setDV("true") causes display values to be returned for all fields instead of original values.

    my $sys_user_group = $sn->table("sys_user_group")->setDV("true");
    my $grp = $sys_user_group->getRecord(name => "Network Support");
    print "manager=", $grp->{manager}, "\n";

setDV("all") causes display values to be returned in addition to original values. Display value fields have a "dv_" prefix.

    my $sys_user_group = $sn->table("sys_user_group")->setDV("all");
    my $grp = $sys_user_group->getRecord(name => "Network Support");
    print "manager=", $grp->{dv_manager}, "\n";

Note that "setDV" is a Table method, not a Query method.

    @recs = $table->setDV(1)->query()->fetchAll(); # Correct
    @recs = $table->query()->setDV(1)->fetchAll(); # INCORRECT!
    

update

This method updates a record. For information on available parameters refer to the ServiceNow documentation on the "update" Direct SOAP API method.

Syntax

    $table->update($sys_id, %parameters);
    $table->update(%parameters);

Note: If the first syntax is used, then the sys_id must be the first parameter. If the second syntax is used, then the sys_id must be included among the parameters.

For reference fields (e.g. assignment_group, assigned_to) you may pass in either a sys_id or a display value.

Examples

The following three examples are equivalent.

    $incident_tbl->update(
        sys_id => $sys_id, 
        assigned_to => "5137153cc611227c000bbd1bd8cd2005",
        incient_state => 2);
        
    $incident_tbl->update(
        sys_id => $sys_id, 
        assigned_to => "Fred Luddy", 
        incident_state => 2);
    
    $incident_tbl->update($sys_id, 
        assigned_to => "Fred Luddy", 
        incident_state => 2);

ServiceNow::SOAP::Query

Query objects and the related functions implement the ServiceNow's best practice recommendation for using Web Services to retrieve a large number of records.

A Query object is essentially a list of keys (sys_ids) for a particular table, and a pointer to the current position in that list. To construct a new Query object use the "query" or "asQuery" Table method.

  • "query" makes a Web Services call ("getKeys") to retrieve a list of keys.

  • "asQuery" simply converts an exsiting list of keys into a Query object.

Once the Query is constructed, the "fetch" and "fetchAll" functions can be used to get the actual records in chunks.

Example

This example illustrates the use of Query objects to traverse the cmdb_rel_ci table. The example involves two tables: cmdb_ci and cmdb_rel_ci.

    my $cmdb_ci_tbl = $sn->table("cmdb_ci");
    my $cmdb_rel_ci_tbl = $sn->table("cmdb_rel_ci");
    

We assume that $parentKey is the sys_id of a known configuration item. The objective is to print a list of all other configuration items on which this item immediately depends. In otherwords, all items which are one level downstream.

First we query cmdb_rel_ci to retrieve a list of records for which this item is the parent. @relData is this list of cmdb_rel_ci records. If there are more than 250 records, fetchAll will loop internally until all records have been retrieved.

    my @relData = $cmdb_rel_ci_tbl->query(parent => $parentKey)->fetchAll();

Next we extract the child field from each of these cmdb_rel_ci records to create a new list of sys_ids.

    my @childKeys = map { $_->{child} } @relData;

@childKeys now contains a lists of sys_ids for configuration items. We convert this list of keys into a query object and fetch the records from the cmdb_ci table.

    @childRecs = $cmdb_ci_tbl->asQuery(@childKeys)->fetchAll();
    foreach my $childRec (@childRecs) {
        print $childRec->{name}, "\n";            
    }

exclude

This method will affect any subsequent calls to "fetch". Any columns not specified in the argument(s) will be excluded from the returned result. By excluding unneeded columns from the query result, it is possible to significantly improve the performance of large queries. For a simpler way to achieve this objective, refer to the "include" method below.

You may pass this method either a list of column names, or a string containing a comma delimited list of names. It will override any prior calls to "exclude" or "include". It returns a reference to the modified Query object.

See also: "except", "include"

Syntax

    $query->exclude(@list_of_columns);
    $query->exclude($comma_delimited_list_of_columns);
    

fetch

Fetch the next chunk of records from a table. Returns a list of hash references.

This method calls "getRecords" to retrieve the records. An optional parameter allows specification of the number of records to be retrieved. If not specified, then the number of records will be based on the default chunk size for this Query object. If there are no remaining records, then an empty list will be returned.

Syntax

    @recs = $query->fetch();
    @recs = $query->fetch($numrecs);

Example

This example prints the names of all active users. Each call to "getRecords" returns up to 100 users.

    my $sys_user = $sn->table("sys_user);
    $sys_user->query(active => "true", __order_by => "name");
    while (@recs = $query->fetch(100)) {
        foreach my $rec (@recs) {
            print $rec->{name}, "\n";
        }
    }

fetchAll

This method fetches all the records in a Query by calling "fetch" repeatedly until there are no more records. It takes an optional argument which is the number of records to be retrieved per fetch. It returns a list of hash references.

Syntax

    @recs = $query->fetchAll();
    @recs = $query->fetchAll($numrecs);
    

Example

This example prints the names of all active users. Each call to "getRecords" returns up to 250 records since no fetch size was specified and 250 is the default.

    my $sys_user = $sn->table("sys_user);
    my @recs = $sys_user->query(active => "true", __order_by => "name")->fetchAll();
    foreach my $rec (@recs) {
         print $rec->{name}, "\n";
    }

getCount

This method returns the total number of keys in the Query.

getKeys

This method returns a list of the keys included in the Query.

Example

The following example calls "getKeys" to create a new query, and then makes of copy of the query using the same list of keys.

    my $query1 = $table->query($encoded_query);
    my $query2 = $table->asQuery($query1->getKeys());

include

This method will affect any subsequent calls to "fetch" by limiting which columns are returned. This method utilizes the "except" method documented above. By including only the needed columns in the query result, it is possible to significantly improve the performance of large queries.

You may pass this method either a list of column names, or a string containing a comma delimited list of names. It will override any prior calls to "exclude" or "include". It returns a reference to the modified Query object.

For some reason the Direct Web Services API allows you to specify a list of columns to be excluded from the query result, but there is no similar out-of-box capability to specify only the columns to be included. This function implements the more obviously needed behavior by inverting the list. It uses the WSDL to generate a list of columns returned by "getRecords", and subtracts the specified names to create an "__exclude_columns" extended query parameter.

See also: "except", "exclude"

Syntax

    $query->include(@list_of_columns);
    $query->include($comma_delimited_list_of_columns);
    

Example

This example returns a list of all records in the cmdb_ci_computer table, but only 5 columns are returned.

    my $tbl = $sn->table("cmdb_ci_computer");
    my $qry = $tbl->query()->include(
        qw(sys_id name sys_class_name operational_status sys_updated_on));
    my @recs = $qry->fetchAll();    

PROXY

You may have trouble using the SOAP API if you are running Perl behind a proxy server. The easiest solution is to configure the proxy with environment variables as in this example.

    use ServiceNow::SOAP;
    $ENV{HTTP_PROXY} = "http://my.proxy.server";
    $ENV{HTTPS_PROXY} = $ENV{HTTP_PROXY};
    $ENV{PERL_LWP_ENV_PROXY} = 1;
    my $sn = ServiceNow($instance, $username, $password);

This works because ServiceNow::SOAP is built on top of SOAP::Lite which is built on top of LWP. For more information refer to: http://search.cpan.org/dist/libwww-perl/lib/LWP.pm#ENVIRONMENT

DIAGNOSTICS

Sometimes, when you are developing a new script, it seems to hang at a certain point, and you just want to know what it is doing. You can enable tracing of Web Service calls by setting the trace option in the "ServiceNow" function as follows.

    my $sn = ServiceNow($instance, $username, $password, trace => 1);

Set trace to 1 to print a single line for each Web Services call. Set trace to 2 to print the complete XML result for each call.

If you want even more, then add the following to your code. This will cause SOAP::Lite to dump the HTTP headers and content for all messages, both sent and received.

    SOAP::Lite->import(+trace => 'debug');

AUTHOR

Giles Lewis <gflewis@cpan.org>

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Greg George, author of ServiceNow::Simple, from which a number of ideas were sourced.

LICENSE

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the the Artistic License (2.0). You may obtain a copy of the full license at:

http://www.perlfoundation.org/artistic_license_2_0

Any use, modification, and distribution of the Standard or Modified Versions is governed by this Artistic License. By using, modifying or distributing the Package, you accept this license. Do not use, modify, or distribute the Package, if you do not accept this license.

If your Modified Version has been derived from a Modified Version made by someone other than you, you are nevertheless required to ensure that your Modified Version complies with the requirements of this license.

This license does not grant you the right to use any trademark, service mark, tradename, or logo of the Copyright Holder.

This license includes the non-exclusive, worldwide, free-of-charge patent license to make, have made, use, offer to sell, sell, import and otherwise transfer the Package with respect to any patent claims licensable by the Copyright Holder that are necessarily infringed by the Package. If you institute patent litigation (including a cross-claim or counterclaim) against any party alleging that the Package constitutes direct or contributory patent infringement, then this Artistic License to you shall terminate on the date that such litigation is filed.

Disclaimer of Warranty: THE PACKAGE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER AND CONTRIBUTORS "AS IS' AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT ARE DISCLAIMED TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY YOUR LOCAL LAW. UNLESS REQUIRED BY LAW, NO COPYRIGHT HOLDER OR CONTRIBUTOR WILL BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THE PACKAGE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.