William Wolf

NAME

Sque - Background job processing based on Resque, using Stomp

VERSION

version 0.010

SYNOPSIS

First you create a Sque instance where you configure the Stomp backend and then you can start sending jobs to be done by workers:

    use Sque;

    my $s = Sque->new( stomp => '127.0.0.1:61613' );
    # Or, for failover
    $s = Sque->new( stomp => [ '127.0.0.1:61613', '127.0.0.2:61613' ] );

    $s->push( my_queue => {
        class => 'My::Task',
        args => [ 'Hello world!' ]
    });

You can also send by just using:

    $s->push({
        class => 'My::Task',
        args => [ 'Hello world!' ]
    });

In this case, the queue will be set automatically automatically to the job class name with colons removed, which in this case would be 'MyTask'.

You can set custom STOMP headers by passing them in as follows:

    $s->push( my_queue => {
        class => 'My::Task',
        args => [ 'Hello world!' ],
        headers => { header1 => 'val1', header2 => 'val2' }
    });

Additionally, the sque command-line tool can be used to send messages:

    $ sque send -h 127.0.0.1 -p 61613 -c My::Task 'Hello world!'

Background jobs can be any perl module that implement a perform() function. The Sque::Job object is passed as the only argument to this function:

    package My::Task;
    use strict;
    use 5.10.0;

    sub perform {
        my ( $job ) = @_;
        say $job->args->[0];
    }

    1;

Background jobs can also be OO. The perform function will still be called with the Sque::Job object as the only argument:

    package My::Task;
    use strict;
    use 5.10.0;
    use Moose;

    with 'Role::Awesome';

    has attr => ( is => 'ro', default => 'Where am I?' );

    sub perform {
        my ( $self, $job ) = @_;
        say $self->attr;
        say $job->args->[0];
    }

    1;

Finally, you run your jobs by instancing a Sque::Worker and telling it to listen to one or more queues:

    use Sque;

    my $w = Sque->new( stomp => '127.0.0.1:61613' )->worker;
    $w->add_queues('my_queue');
    $w->work;

Or you can simply use the sque command-line tool which uses App::Sque like so:

    $ sque work --host 127.0.0.1 --port 61613 --workers 5 --lib ./lib --lib ./lib2 --queues Queue1,Queue2,Queue3

DESCRIPTION

This is a copy of resque-perl by Diego Kuperman simplified a little bit (for better or worse) and made to work with any stomp server rather than Redis.

ATTRIBUTES

stomp

A Stomp Client on this sque instance.

namespace

Namespace for queues, default is 'sque'

worker

A Sque::Worker on this sque instance.

METHODS

push

Pushes a job onto a queue. Queue name should be a string and the item should be a Sque::Job object or a hashref containing: class - The String name of the job class to run. args - Any arrayref of arguments to pass the job.

Example:

    $sque->push( archive => { class => 'Archive', args => [ 35, 'tar' ] } )

pop

Pops a job off a queue. Queue name should be a string. Returns a l<Sque::Job> object.

key

Concatenate $self-namespace> with the received array of names to build a redis key name for this sque instance.

new_job

Build a Sque::Job object on this system for the given hashref(see Sque::Job) or string(payload for object).

ATTRIBUTES

HELPER METHODS

TODO

  • Make App::Sque that will let you run sque and just pass it the stomp server/port, queue list, lib directories (if needed), and number of workers.

  • More (real) tests.

AUTHOR

William Wolf <throughnothing@gmail.com>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

William Wolf has dedicated the work to the Commons by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.

Works under CC0 do not require attribution. When citing the work, you should not imply endorsement by the author.