NAME

Plack::App::FakeApache - Wrapping mod_perl2 applications in Plack

SYNOPSIS

  use Plack::App::FakeApache;

  my $app = Plack::App::FakeApache->new( 
    response_handler => "My::ResponseHandler"
    dir_config => { ... }
  )->to_app;    

DESCRIPTION

Plack::App::FakeApache transforms a mod_perl2 application into a PSGI application

NOTICE

While this code is labeled "Proof of Concept" it's been around a while now, and seems stable. However the major problem with mod_perl as a web application development environment is that there are too many ways to do it, and this API only handles a common subset of functionality. Thus you may have to get your hands dirty in the code for serious use. Contributions welcomed.

CONFIGURATION

*_handler arguments support multiple "stacked" handlers if passed as an arrayref.

authen_handler
authz_handler
response_handler (required)
handler (alias for response_handler)

Handlers for the respective request phases. Pass a blessed object, a class name or use the Class->method syntax. See the mod_perl docs for calling conventions.

request_class

If you want to subclass Plack::App::FakeApache::Request do so here. Make sure that your subclass inherits from Plack::App::FakeApache::Request (duh). You may want this if you need to handle subclasses of your apache request object, or to cover some kinds of functionality not exposed by this module.

without_cgi =item with_cgi

CGI.pm does bad things to STDIN and ENV. This attribute is a helper in order to help move away from it (as in, once CGI.pm is properly expurgated your app will run ok with whitout_cgi switched on.

In the interestes of naming things, while construction is handled by without_cgi, the code itself looks for its negation with_cgi when applying the conditional logic in order to avoid cumbersome double-negatives.

  my $app = Plack::App::FakeApache->new({ 
      handler       => 'MyApp',
      without_cgi   => 1,
   })->to_app;

   my $client = Plack::Client->new( 'psgi-local' => { apps => { myapp => $app } } );

   my $res = $client->post('psgi-local://myapp/path/to/wherever', 
                           [], { parms => 'go', here => 'yeah' });
dir_config

Hash used to resolve $req->dir_config() requests. Defaults to an empty hashref.

root

Root directory of the file system (optional, defaults to the current working directory)

logger

The destination of the log messages (i.e. the errorlog). This should be a file handle

request_args

Aditional args passed to the fake request object. E.g. auth_name and auth_type.

APACHE METHODS

The following methods from Apache2::RequestRec and mixins are supported:

headers_in
headers_out
subprecess_env
dir_config
method
unparsed_uri
uri
user
hostname
content_type
content_encoding
status
log_reason (implemented as a no-op)
read
print
write
filename
construct_url
auth_type
auth_name
is_initial_req

PLACK METHODS

A few methods have been added to the interface to enable interaction with Plack:

plack_request

Returns the underling Plack::Request object

plack_response

Returns the underlying Plack::Response object. During the request phase this is incomplete.

finalize

Fills information into the response object and finalizes it.

MOD_PERL OVERRIDES

mod_perl overrides exit with ModPerl::Util. The way I (kd) have handled this was that in order to avoid the horrors of overriding CORE::GLOBAL::EXIT was to have a subroutine main::legacy_exit defined in the startup.pl or in the .psgi file which calls die "EXIT 0". Meanwhile this specific exception is ignored by Plack::APP::FakeApache.

TODO: There are other circumstances where exception handling routines in upstream legacy mod_perl code are insufficiently well structured to catch at the plack level, so the exception handling won't catch them. In this situation a user configurable list of exception content earmarked for custom handling is desirable (e.g. where a 500 error really ought to be treated as a 404). I intend to implement this some time RSN.

AUTHOR

Kieren Diment zarquon@cpan.org. Peter Makholm, peter@makholm.net